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Vitamin B6 intake and the risk of incident kidney stones.
Urolithiasis 2018; 46(3):265-270U

Abstract

Higher vitamin B6 intake might reduce urinary excretion of oxalate, one of the major determinants of risk for calcium oxalate kidney stones. Previous studies investigating the association between intake of vitamin B6 and risk of stones found conflicting results. We sought to investigate the association in three large prospective cohorts. We prospectively examined the association in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS; n = 42,919 men), Nurses' Health Study I (NHS I; n = 60,003 older women), and Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II; n = 90,629 younger women). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident stones across categories of total vitamin B6 intake (<3.0, 3.0-4.9, 5.0-9.9, 10.0-39.9, ≥40.0 mg/day) were generated with Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for potential confounders. During 3,316,846 person-years of follow-up, 6576 incident kidney stones were confirmed. In univariate and multivariate analyses, there was no association between intake of vitamin B6 and incident stones. The HR for stones in the highest category compared with the lowest was 1.05 (95% CI 0.85, 1.30; p value for trend = 0.61) for HPFS, 0.95 (95% CI 0.76, 1.18; p value for trend = 0.42) for NHS I, and 1.06 (95% CI 0.91, 1.24; p value for trend = 0.34) for NHS II. The pooled adjusted HR for the highest category compared with the lowest was 1.03 (95% CI 0.92, 1.15; p value for trend = 0.60). Intake of vitamin B6 is not associated with risk of incident kidney stones.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, 00168, Rome, Italy. pietromanuel.ferraro@unicatt.it.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, USA.Division of Nephrology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, 00168, Rome, Italy.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28674784

Citation

Ferraro, Pietro Manuel, et al. "Vitamin B6 Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones." Urolithiasis, vol. 46, no. 3, 2018, pp. 265-270.
Ferraro PM, Taylor EN, Gambaro G, et al. Vitamin B6 intake and the risk of incident kidney stones. Urolithiasis. 2018;46(3):265-270.
Ferraro, P. M., Taylor, E. N., Gambaro, G., & Curhan, G. C. (2018). Vitamin B6 intake and the risk of incident kidney stones. Urolithiasis, 46(3), pp. 265-270. doi:10.1007/s00240-017-0999-5.
Ferraro PM, et al. Vitamin B6 Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. Urolithiasis. 2018;46(3):265-270. PubMed PMID: 28674784.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin B6 intake and the risk of incident kidney stones. AU - Ferraro,Pietro Manuel, AU - Taylor,Eric N, AU - Gambaro,Giovanni, AU - Curhan,Gary C, Y1 - 2017/07/03/ PY - 2017/01/30/received PY - 2017/06/27/accepted PY - 2017/7/5/pubmed PY - 2018/10/12/medline PY - 2017/7/5/entrez KW - Cohort studies KW - Nutrition KW - Urolithiasis KW - Vitamin B6 SP - 265 EP - 270 JF - Urolithiasis JO - Urolithiasis VL - 46 IS - 3 N2 - Higher vitamin B6 intake might reduce urinary excretion of oxalate, one of the major determinants of risk for calcium oxalate kidney stones. Previous studies investigating the association between intake of vitamin B6 and risk of stones found conflicting results. We sought to investigate the association in three large prospective cohorts. We prospectively examined the association in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS; n = 42,919 men), Nurses' Health Study I (NHS I; n = 60,003 older women), and Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II; n = 90,629 younger women). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident stones across categories of total vitamin B6 intake (<3.0, 3.0-4.9, 5.0-9.9, 10.0-39.9, ≥40.0 mg/day) were generated with Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for potential confounders. During 3,316,846 person-years of follow-up, 6576 incident kidney stones were confirmed. In univariate and multivariate analyses, there was no association between intake of vitamin B6 and incident stones. The HR for stones in the highest category compared with the lowest was 1.05 (95% CI 0.85, 1.30; p value for trend = 0.61) for HPFS, 0.95 (95% CI 0.76, 1.18; p value for trend = 0.42) for NHS I, and 1.06 (95% CI 0.91, 1.24; p value for trend = 0.34) for NHS II. The pooled adjusted HR for the highest category compared with the lowest was 1.03 (95% CI 0.92, 1.15; p value for trend = 0.60). Intake of vitamin B6 is not associated with risk of incident kidney stones. SN - 2194-7236 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28674784/Vitamin_B6_intake_and_the_risk_of_incident_kidney_stones_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00240-017-0999-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -