Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

[Gut microbiota and immune crosstalk in metabolic disease].
Biol Aujourdhui. 2017; 211(1):1-18.BA

Abstract

The aim of the review is to discuss about the role played by the defence crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the intestinal immune system, in the development of metabolic disease focusing on obesity and diabetes. Starting from physiological and pathological stand points and based on the latest published data, this review is addressing how the concept of the hologenome theory of evolution can drive the fate of metabolic disease. The notion of "metabolic infection" to explain the "metabolic inflammation" is discussed. This imply comments about the process of bacterial translocation and impaired intestinal immune defense against commensals. Eventually this review sets the soil for personalized medicine. The monthly increase in the number of publications on the gut microbiota to intestinal immune defense and the control of metabolism demonstrate the importance of this field of investigation. The notion of commensal as "self or non-self" has to be reevaluated in the light of the current data. Furthermore, data demonstrate the major role played by short chain fatty acids, secondary bile acids, LPS, peptidoglycans, indole derivatives, and other bacteria-related molecules on the shaping of cells involved in the intestinal protection against commensals is now becoming a central player in the incidence of metabolic diseases. The literature demonstrates that the onset of metabolic diseases and some specific co-morbidities can be explained by a gut microbiota to intestinal immune system crosstalk. Therefore, one should now consider this avenue of investigation as a putative source of biomarkers and therapeutic targets to personalize the treatment of metabolic disease and its co-morbidities. Gut microbiota is considered as a major regulator of metabolic disease. This reconciles the notion of metabolic inflammation and the epidemic development of the disease. In addition to evidence showing that a specific gut microbiota characterizes patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic steatosis, the mechanisms causal to the disease could be related to the translocation of microbiota from the gut to the tissues, which induces inflammation. The mechanisms regulating such a process are based on the crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the host immune system. The hologenome theory of evolution supports this concept and implies that therapeutic strategies aiming to control glycemia should take into account both the gut microbiota and the host immune system. This review discusses the latest evidence regarding the bidirectional impact of the gut microbiota on host immune system crosstalk for the control of metabolic disease, hyperglycemia, and obesity. To avoid redundancies with the literature, we will focus our attention on the intestinal immune system, identifying evidence for the generation of novel therapeutic strategies, which could be based on the control of the translocation of gut bacteria to tissues. Such novel strategies should hamper the role played by gut microbiota dysbiosis on the development of metabolic inflammation. Recent evidence in rodents allows us to conclude that an impaired intestinal immune system characterizes and could be causal in the development of metabolic disease. The fine understanding of the molecular mechanisms should allow for the development of a first line of treatment for metabolic disease and its co-morbidities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), 31024 Toulouse, France - Université Paul Sabatier (UPS), Unité Mixte de Recherche (UMR) 1048, Hôpital Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse, France - Institut des Maladies Métaboliques et Cardiovasculaires (I2MC), 31432 Toulouse Cedex 4, France.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

fre

PubMed ID

28682223

Citation

Burcelin, Rémy. "[Gut Microbiota and Immune Crosstalk in Metabolic Disease]." Biologie Aujourd'hui, vol. 211, no. 1, 2017, pp. 1-18.
Burcelin R. [Gut microbiota and immune crosstalk in metabolic disease]. Biol Aujourdhui. 2017;211(1):1-18.
Burcelin, R. (2017). [Gut microbiota and immune crosstalk in metabolic disease]. Biologie Aujourd'hui, 211(1), 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1051/jbio/2017008
Burcelin R. [Gut Microbiota and Immune Crosstalk in Metabolic Disease]. Biol Aujourdhui. 2017;211(1):1-18. PubMed PMID: 28682223.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Gut microbiota and immune crosstalk in metabolic disease]. A1 - Burcelin,Rémy, Y1 - 2017/07/06/ PY - 2017/01/21/received PY - 2017/7/7/entrez PY - 2017/7/7/pubmed PY - 2018/4/24/medline SP - 1 EP - 18 JF - Biologie aujourd'hui JO - Biol Aujourdhui VL - 211 IS - 1 N2 - The aim of the review is to discuss about the role played by the defence crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the intestinal immune system, in the development of metabolic disease focusing on obesity and diabetes. Starting from physiological and pathological stand points and based on the latest published data, this review is addressing how the concept of the hologenome theory of evolution can drive the fate of metabolic disease. The notion of "metabolic infection" to explain the "metabolic inflammation" is discussed. This imply comments about the process of bacterial translocation and impaired intestinal immune defense against commensals. Eventually this review sets the soil for personalized medicine. The monthly increase in the number of publications on the gut microbiota to intestinal immune defense and the control of metabolism demonstrate the importance of this field of investigation. The notion of commensal as "self or non-self" has to be reevaluated in the light of the current data. Furthermore, data demonstrate the major role played by short chain fatty acids, secondary bile acids, LPS, peptidoglycans, indole derivatives, and other bacteria-related molecules on the shaping of cells involved in the intestinal protection against commensals is now becoming a central player in the incidence of metabolic diseases. The literature demonstrates that the onset of metabolic diseases and some specific co-morbidities can be explained by a gut microbiota to intestinal immune system crosstalk. Therefore, one should now consider this avenue of investigation as a putative source of biomarkers and therapeutic targets to personalize the treatment of metabolic disease and its co-morbidities. Gut microbiota is considered as a major regulator of metabolic disease. This reconciles the notion of metabolic inflammation and the epidemic development of the disease. In addition to evidence showing that a specific gut microbiota characterizes patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic steatosis, the mechanisms causal to the disease could be related to the translocation of microbiota from the gut to the tissues, which induces inflammation. The mechanisms regulating such a process are based on the crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the host immune system. The hologenome theory of evolution supports this concept and implies that therapeutic strategies aiming to control glycemia should take into account both the gut microbiota and the host immune system. This review discusses the latest evidence regarding the bidirectional impact of the gut microbiota on host immune system crosstalk for the control of metabolic disease, hyperglycemia, and obesity. To avoid redundancies with the literature, we will focus our attention on the intestinal immune system, identifying evidence for the generation of novel therapeutic strategies, which could be based on the control of the translocation of gut bacteria to tissues. Such novel strategies should hamper the role played by gut microbiota dysbiosis on the development of metabolic inflammation. Recent evidence in rodents allows us to conclude that an impaired intestinal immune system characterizes and could be causal in the development of metabolic disease. The fine understanding of the molecular mechanisms should allow for the development of a first line of treatment for metabolic disease and its co-morbidities. SN - 2105-0686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28682223/[Gut_microbiota_and_immune_crosstalk_in_metabolic_disease]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/metabolicdisorders.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -