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Reassortment process after co-infection of pigs with avian H1N1 and swine H3N2 influenza viruses.
BMC Vet Res 2017; 13(1):215BV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The influenza A virus is highly variable, which, to some degree, is caused by the reassortment of viral genetic material. This process plays a major role in the generation of novel influenza virus strains that can emerge in a new host population. Due to the susceptibility of pigs to infections with avian, swine and human influenza viruses, they are considered intermediate hosts for the adaptation of the avian influenza virus to humans. In order to test the reassortment process in pigs, they were co-infected with H3N2 A/swine/Gent/172/2008 (Gent/08) and H1N1 A/duck/Italy/1447/2005 (Italy/05) and co-housed with a group of naïve piglets.

RESULTS

The Gent/08 strains dominated over Italy/05, but reassortment occurred. The reassortant strains of the H1N1 subtype (12.5%) with one gene (NP or M) of swine-origin were identified in the nasal discharge of the contact-exposed piglets.

CONCLUSIONS

These results demonstrate that despite their low efficiency, genotypically and phenotypically different influenza A viruses can undergo genetic exchange during co-infection of pigs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Swine Diseases, National Veterinary Research Institute, 57 Partyzantów Avenue, 24-100, Puławy, Poland. kinga.urbaniak@piwet.pulawy.pl.Department of Swine Diseases, National Veterinary Research Institute, 57 Partyzantów Avenue, 24-100, Puławy, Poland. Present Address: Laboratory of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, 159c Nowoursynowska Street, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland.Department of Swine Diseases, National Veterinary Research Institute, 57 Partyzantów Avenue, 24-100, Puławy, Poland. Present Address: Wrocław Research Centre EIT+, 147 Stabłowicka Street, 54-066, Wrocław, Poland.Department of Swine Diseases, National Veterinary Research Institute, 57 Partyzantów Avenue, 24-100, Puławy, Poland.Department of Swine Diseases, National Veterinary Research Institute, 57 Partyzantów Avenue, 24-100, Puławy, Poland.Department of Swine Diseases, National Veterinary Research Institute, 57 Partyzantów Avenue, 24-100, Puławy, Poland.Department of Swine Diseases, National Veterinary Research Institute, 57 Partyzantów Avenue, 24-100, Puławy, Poland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28688454

Citation

Urbaniak, Kinga, et al. "Reassortment Process After Co-infection of Pigs With Avian H1N1 and Swine H3N2 Influenza Viruses." BMC Veterinary Research, vol. 13, no. 1, 2017, p. 215.
Urbaniak K, Markowska-Daniel I, Kowalczyk A, et al. Reassortment process after co-infection of pigs with avian H1N1 and swine H3N2 influenza viruses. BMC Vet Res. 2017;13(1):215.
Urbaniak, K., Markowska-Daniel, I., Kowalczyk, A., Kwit, K., Pomorska-Mól, M., Frącek, B., & Pejsak, Z. (2017). Reassortment process after co-infection of pigs with avian H1N1 and swine H3N2 influenza viruses. BMC Veterinary Research, 13(1), p. 215. doi:10.1186/s12917-017-1137-x.
Urbaniak K, et al. Reassortment Process After Co-infection of Pigs With Avian H1N1 and Swine H3N2 Influenza Viruses. BMC Vet Res. 2017 Jul 8;13(1):215. PubMed PMID: 28688454.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reassortment process after co-infection of pigs with avian H1N1 and swine H3N2 influenza viruses. AU - Urbaniak,Kinga, AU - Markowska-Daniel,Iwona, AU - Kowalczyk,Andrzej, AU - Kwit,Krzysztof, AU - Pomorska-Mól,Małgorzata, AU - Frącek,Barbara, AU - Pejsak,Zygmunt, Y1 - 2017/07/08/ PY - 2016/10/20/received PY - 2017/06/30/accepted PY - 2017/7/10/entrez PY - 2017/7/10/pubmed PY - 2018/4/3/medline KW - Avian influenza virus KW - Pig KW - Reassortment KW - Swine influenza virus SP - 215 EP - 215 JF - BMC veterinary research JO - BMC Vet. Res. VL - 13 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The influenza A virus is highly variable, which, to some degree, is caused by the reassortment of viral genetic material. This process plays a major role in the generation of novel influenza virus strains that can emerge in a new host population. Due to the susceptibility of pigs to infections with avian, swine and human influenza viruses, they are considered intermediate hosts for the adaptation of the avian influenza virus to humans. In order to test the reassortment process in pigs, they were co-infected with H3N2 A/swine/Gent/172/2008 (Gent/08) and H1N1 A/duck/Italy/1447/2005 (Italy/05) and co-housed with a group of naïve piglets. RESULTS: The Gent/08 strains dominated over Italy/05, but reassortment occurred. The reassortant strains of the H1N1 subtype (12.5%) with one gene (NP or M) of swine-origin were identified in the nasal discharge of the contact-exposed piglets. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that despite their low efficiency, genotypically and phenotypically different influenza A viruses can undergo genetic exchange during co-infection of pigs. SN - 1746-6148 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28688454/Reassortment_process_after_co_infection_of_pigs_with_avian_H1N1_and_swine_H3N2_influenza_viruses_ L2 - https://bmcvetres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12917-017-1137-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -