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Trends in exposure to respirable crystalline silica (1986-2014) in Australian mining.
Am J Ind Med. 2017 Aug; 60(8):673-678.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Respirable crystalline silica (RCS) has been associated with severe health risks. Exposures in Western Australia (WA) have been typically high in hard-rock mining and have reduced substantially since the mid-1900s. We described trends in RCS exposure in WA miners over the past 30 years.

METHODS

A total of 79 445 reported personal RCS exposure measurements, covering the years 1986-2014, were examined. Mixed-effects models were applied to estimate RCS exposure levels, including spline terms to estimate a time trend.

RESULTS

An overall downward trend of about -8% per year was observed for RCS exposures in WA mining. Highest RCS exposure levels were modeled for base metal mining and exploration settings. Drilling occupations were among the highest exposed jobs.

CONCLUSION

RCS exposure levels have fallen considerably in the last three decades. However, there are still mining occupations that may need further attention to avoid adverse health effects in these workers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Occupational Respiratory Epidemiology, School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.Occupational Respiratory Epidemiology, School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia.School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.Occupational Respiratory Epidemiology, School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28692194

Citation

Peters, Susan, et al. "Trends in Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica (1986-2014) in Australian Mining." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 60, no. 8, 2017, pp. 673-678.
Peters S, Vermeulen R, Fritschi L, et al. Trends in exposure to respirable crystalline silica (1986-2014) in Australian mining. Am J Ind Med. 2017;60(8):673-678.
Peters, S., Vermeulen, R., Fritschi, L., Musk, A. B., Reid, A., & de Klerk, N. (2017). Trends in exposure to respirable crystalline silica (1986-2014) in Australian mining. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 60(8), 673-678. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22740
Peters S, et al. Trends in Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica (1986-2014) in Australian Mining. Am J Ind Med. 2017;60(8):673-678. PubMed PMID: 28692194.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in exposure to respirable crystalline silica (1986-2014) in Australian mining. AU - Peters,Susan, AU - Vermeulen,Roel, AU - Fritschi,Lin, AU - Musk,Aw Bill, AU - Reid,Alison, AU - de Klerk,Nicholas, PY - 2017/05/16/accepted PY - 2017/7/11/entrez PY - 2017/7/12/pubmed PY - 2018/4/20/medline KW - miners KW - occupational exposure KW - personal exposure KW - quartz KW - temporal trend SP - 673 EP - 678 JF - American journal of industrial medicine JO - Am J Ind Med VL - 60 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Respirable crystalline silica (RCS) has been associated with severe health risks. Exposures in Western Australia (WA) have been typically high in hard-rock mining and have reduced substantially since the mid-1900s. We described trends in RCS exposure in WA miners over the past 30 years. METHODS: A total of 79 445 reported personal RCS exposure measurements, covering the years 1986-2014, were examined. Mixed-effects models were applied to estimate RCS exposure levels, including spline terms to estimate a time trend. RESULTS: An overall downward trend of about -8% per year was observed for RCS exposures in WA mining. Highest RCS exposure levels were modeled for base metal mining and exploration settings. Drilling occupations were among the highest exposed jobs. CONCLUSION: RCS exposure levels have fallen considerably in the last three decades. However, there are still mining occupations that may need further attention to avoid adverse health effects in these workers. SN - 1097-0274 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28692194/Trends_in_exposure_to_respirable_crystalline_silica__1986_2014__in_Australian_mining_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22740 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -