Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations.
Ann Intern Med 2017; 167(4):228-235AIM

Abstract

Background

Coffee consumption has been associated with reduced risk for death in prospective cohort studies; however, data in nonwhites are sparse.

Objective

To examine the association of coffee consumption with risk for total and cause-specific death.

Design

The MEC (Multiethnic Cohort), a prospective population-based cohort study established between 1993 and 1996.

Setting

Hawaii and Los Angeles, California.

Participants

185 855 African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and whites aged 45 to 75 years at recruitment.

Measurements

Outcomes were total and cause-specific mortality between 1993 and 2012. Coffee intake was assessed at baseline by means of a validated food-frequency questionnaire.

Results

58 397 participants died during 3 195 484 person-years of follow-up (average follow-up, 16.2 years). Compared with drinking no coffee, coffee consumption was associated with lower total mortality after adjustment for smoking and other potential confounders (1 cup per day: hazard ratio [HR], 0.88 [95% CI, 0.85 to 0.91]; 2 to 3 cups per day: HR, 0.82 [CI, 0.79 to 0.86]; ≥4 cups per day: HR, 0.82 [CI, 0.78 to 0.87]; P for trend < 0.001). Trends were similar between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Significant inverse associations were observed in 4 ethnic groups; the association in Native Hawaiians did not reach statistical significance. Inverse associations were also seen in never-smokers, younger participants (<55 years), and those who had not previously reported a chronic disease. Among examined end points, inverse associations were observed for deaths due to heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney disease.

Limitation

Unmeasured confounding and measurement error, although sensitivity analysis suggested that neither was likely to affect results.

Conclusion

Higher consumption of coffee was associated with lower risk for death in African Americans, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and whites.

Primary Funding Source

National Cancer Institute.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From University of Hawai'i Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; and Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.From University of Hawai'i Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; and Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.From University of Hawai'i Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; and Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.From University of Hawai'i Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; and Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.From University of Hawai'i Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; and Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.From University of Hawai'i Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; and Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28693036

Citation

Park, Song-Yi, et al. "Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations." Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 167, no. 4, 2017, pp. 228-235.
Park SY, Freedman ND, Haiman CA, et al. Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations. Ann Intern Med. 2017;167(4):228-235.
Park, S. Y., Freedman, N. D., Haiman, C. A., Le Marchand, L., Wilkens, L. R., & Setiawan, V. W. (2017). Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations. Annals of Internal Medicine, 167(4), pp. 228-235. doi:10.7326/M16-2472.
Park SY, et al. Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations. Ann Intern Med. 2017 Aug 15;167(4):228-235. PubMed PMID: 28693036.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations. AU - Park,Song-Yi, AU - Freedman,Neal D, AU - Haiman,Christopher A, AU - Le Marchand,Loïc, AU - Wilkens,Lynne R, AU - Setiawan,Veronica Wendy, Y1 - 2017/07/11/ PY - 2017/7/12/pubmed PY - 2017/8/23/medline PY - 2017/7/11/entrez SP - 228 EP - 235 JF - Annals of internal medicine JO - Ann. Intern. Med. VL - 167 IS - 4 N2 - Background: Coffee consumption has been associated with reduced risk for death in prospective cohort studies; however, data in nonwhites are sparse. Objective: To examine the association of coffee consumption with risk for total and cause-specific death. Design: The MEC (Multiethnic Cohort), a prospective population-based cohort study established between 1993 and 1996. Setting: Hawaii and Los Angeles, California. Participants: 185 855 African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and whites aged 45 to 75 years at recruitment. Measurements: Outcomes were total and cause-specific mortality between 1993 and 2012. Coffee intake was assessed at baseline by means of a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Results: 58 397 participants died during 3 195 484 person-years of follow-up (average follow-up, 16.2 years). Compared with drinking no coffee, coffee consumption was associated with lower total mortality after adjustment for smoking and other potential confounders (1 cup per day: hazard ratio [HR], 0.88 [95% CI, 0.85 to 0.91]; 2 to 3 cups per day: HR, 0.82 [CI, 0.79 to 0.86]; ≥4 cups per day: HR, 0.82 [CI, 0.78 to 0.87]; P for trend < 0.001). Trends were similar between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Significant inverse associations were observed in 4 ethnic groups; the association in Native Hawaiians did not reach statistical significance. Inverse associations were also seen in never-smokers, younger participants (<55 years), and those who had not previously reported a chronic disease. Among examined end points, inverse associations were observed for deaths due to heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney disease. Limitation: Unmeasured confounding and measurement error, although sensitivity analysis suggested that neither was likely to affect results. Conclusion: Higher consumption of coffee was associated with lower risk for death in African Americans, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and whites. Primary Funding Source: National Cancer Institute. SN - 1539-3704 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28693036/Association_of_Coffee_Consumption_With_Total_and_Cause_Specific_Mortality_Among_Nonwhite_Populations_ L2 - https://www.annals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.7326/M16-2472 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -