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Friendship Dynamics of Adolescent Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social Status: The Moderating Role of Gender.
J Youth Adolesc. 2017 11; 46(11):2305-2320.JY

Abstract

Interactions with friends are a salient part of adolescents' experience at school. Adolescents tend to form friendships with similar peers and, in turn, their friends influence adolescents' behaviors and beliefs. The current study investigated early adolescents' selection of friends and friends' influence with regard to physical aggression, prosocial behavior, and popularity and social preference (i.e., likeability) among fifth and sixth graders (N = 736, 52% girls at wave1, N = 677, 52% girls at wave 2) in elementary schools in South Korea. The moderating role of gender on early adolescents' friend selection and influence was also examined. With longitudinal social network analysis (RSiena), we found that youth tended to select friends with similar levels of physical aggression and popularity, and their friends influenced their own physical aggression and popularity over time. The higher youth were in social preference, the less likely they chose physically aggressive peers as friends. Boys were more likely to select highly popular peers as friends compared to girls, and influence effects for physical aggression and popularity were stronger for boys compared to girls. The results underscore the importance of gender in friendship dynamics among Asian early adolescents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Educational Psychology, Oklahoma State University, 217 Willard Hall, Stillwater, OK, 74078, USA. huiyoung.shin@okstate.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28699121

Citation

Shin, Huiyoung. "Friendship Dynamics of Adolescent Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social Status: the Moderating Role of Gender." Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 46, no. 11, 2017, pp. 2305-2320.
Shin H. Friendship Dynamics of Adolescent Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social Status: The Moderating Role of Gender. J Youth Adolesc. 2017;46(11):2305-2320.
Shin, H. (2017). Friendship Dynamics of Adolescent Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social Status: The Moderating Role of Gender. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 46(11), 2305-2320. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-017-0702-8
Shin H. Friendship Dynamics of Adolescent Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social Status: the Moderating Role of Gender. J Youth Adolesc. 2017;46(11):2305-2320. PubMed PMID: 28699121.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Friendship Dynamics of Adolescent Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social Status: The Moderating Role of Gender. A1 - Shin,Huiyoung, Y1 - 2017/07/11/ PY - 2017/03/31/received PY - 2017/06/05/accepted PY - 2017/7/13/pubmed PY - 2018/5/15/medline PY - 2017/7/13/entrez KW - Friend selection and influence KW - Gender KW - Physical aggression KW - Popularity and social preference KW - Prosocial behavior KW - Social network analysis SP - 2305 EP - 2320 JF - Journal of youth and adolescence JO - J Youth Adolesc VL - 46 IS - 11 N2 - Interactions with friends are a salient part of adolescents' experience at school. Adolescents tend to form friendships with similar peers and, in turn, their friends influence adolescents' behaviors and beliefs. The current study investigated early adolescents' selection of friends and friends' influence with regard to physical aggression, prosocial behavior, and popularity and social preference (i.e., likeability) among fifth and sixth graders (N = 736, 52% girls at wave1, N = 677, 52% girls at wave 2) in elementary schools in South Korea. The moderating role of gender on early adolescents' friend selection and influence was also examined. With longitudinal social network analysis (RSiena), we found that youth tended to select friends with similar levels of physical aggression and popularity, and their friends influenced their own physical aggression and popularity over time. The higher youth were in social preference, the less likely they chose physically aggressive peers as friends. Boys were more likely to select highly popular peers as friends compared to girls, and influence effects for physical aggression and popularity were stronger for boys compared to girls. The results underscore the importance of gender in friendship dynamics among Asian early adolescents. SN - 1573-6601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28699121/Friendship_Dynamics_of_Adolescent_Aggression_Prosocial_Behavior_and_Social_Status:_The_Moderating_Role_of_Gender_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-017-0702-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -