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Epidemiology and clinical outcomes of snakebite in the elderly: a ToxIC database study.
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2018 02; 56(2):108-112.CT

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Epidemiologic studies of snakebites in the United States report typical victims to be young men. Little is known regarding other demographics including children and the elderly. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of snake bite in elderly patients reported to the ToxIC (Toxicology Investigators Consortium) North American Snakebite Registry (NASBR) Methods: This was a multicenter analysis of a prospectively collected cohort of patients with snakebite reported to the ToxIC NASBR between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2015. Inclusion criterion was age >65. Variables collected included patient demographics, medical comorbidities, medications, date the case was reported to the registry, location of exposure, bite location, snake species, clinical manifestations, outcomes, and management.

RESULTS

Of the 450 cases reported, 30 (6.7%) occurred in elderly patients, with an average age of 74 years. Rattlesnake envenomations were common (93.3%). The majority of patients were men (66.7%) and reported at least one medical comorbidity (83.3%). Most patients were on cardiac medications (60%) and use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant medications was common (33%). Hemotoxicity occurred in 30% of patients on initial presentation and 11.5% of patients on initial follow-up. No clinically significant early or late bleeding was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Elderly patients with North American snake envenomation are likely to have co-morbidities and to take medications that may increase their risk for hemotoxicity, however risk of bleeding or other complications was not increased in this group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology , University of Southern California , Los Angeles , CA , USA.b Department of Medical Toxicology , Banner-University Medical Center Phoenix , Phoenix , AZ , USA.c Department of Emergency Medicine , Univesity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center , Dallas , TX , USA.d Department of Emergency Medicine , UCSF Fresno Medical Center , Fresno , CA , USA.c Department of Emergency Medicine , Univesity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center , Dallas , TX , USA.b Department of Medical Toxicology , Banner-University Medical Center Phoenix , Phoenix , AZ , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28703020

Citation

Spyres, Meghan B., et al. "Epidemiology and Clinical Outcomes of Snakebite in the Elderly: a ToxIC Database Study." Clinical Toxicology (Philadelphia, Pa.), vol. 56, no. 2, 2018, pp. 108-112.
Spyres MB, Ruha AM, Kleinschmidt K, et al. Epidemiology and clinical outcomes of snakebite in the elderly: a ToxIC database study. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2018;56(2):108-112.
Spyres, M. B., Ruha, A. M., Kleinschmidt, K., Vohra, R., Smith, E., & Padilla-Jones, A. (2018). Epidemiology and clinical outcomes of snakebite in the elderly: a ToxIC database study. Clinical Toxicology (Philadelphia, Pa.), 56(2), 108-112. https://doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2017.1342829
Spyres MB, et al. Epidemiology and Clinical Outcomes of Snakebite in the Elderly: a ToxIC Database Study. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2018;56(2):108-112. PubMed PMID: 28703020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology and clinical outcomes of snakebite in the elderly: a ToxIC database study. AU - Spyres,Meghan B, AU - Ruha,Anne-Michelle, AU - Kleinschmidt,Kurt, AU - Vohra,Rais, AU - Smith,Eric, AU - Padilla-Jones,Angela, Y1 - 2017/07/13/ PY - 2017/7/14/pubmed PY - 2019/3/30/medline PY - 2017/7/14/entrez KW - Snakebite KW - ToxIC KW - elderly KW - rattlesnake KW - risk factor SP - 108 EP - 112 JF - Clinical toxicology (Philadelphia, Pa.) JO - Clin Toxicol (Phila) VL - 56 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Epidemiologic studies of snakebites in the United States report typical victims to be young men. Little is known regarding other demographics including children and the elderly. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of snake bite in elderly patients reported to the ToxIC (Toxicology Investigators Consortium) North American Snakebite Registry (NASBR) Methods: This was a multicenter analysis of a prospectively collected cohort of patients with snakebite reported to the ToxIC NASBR between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2015. Inclusion criterion was age >65. Variables collected included patient demographics, medical comorbidities, medications, date the case was reported to the registry, location of exposure, bite location, snake species, clinical manifestations, outcomes, and management. RESULTS: Of the 450 cases reported, 30 (6.7%) occurred in elderly patients, with an average age of 74 years. Rattlesnake envenomations were common (93.3%). The majority of patients were men (66.7%) and reported at least one medical comorbidity (83.3%). Most patients were on cardiac medications (60%) and use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant medications was common (33%). Hemotoxicity occurred in 30% of patients on initial presentation and 11.5% of patients on initial follow-up. No clinically significant early or late bleeding was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly patients with North American snake envenomation are likely to have co-morbidities and to take medications that may increase their risk for hemotoxicity, however risk of bleeding or other complications was not increased in this group. SN - 1556-9519 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28703020/Epidemiology_and_clinical_outcomes_of_snakebite_in_the_elderly:_a_ToxIC_database_study_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15563650.2017.1342829 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -