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Deal or no deal? The prevalence and nutritional quality of price promotions among U.S. food and beverage purchases.
Appetite. 2017 10 01; 117:365-372.A

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study examines trends in the prevalence of price promotions among packaged food and beverage purchases, differences in prevalence by household race/ethnicity or income, and the association between price promotions and the nutritional profile of purchases.

DESIGN

This cross-sectional study utilizes a dataset of 90 million purchases from 38,744 (2008) to 45,042 (2012) US households in 2008-2012. Chi-square tests were used to examine whether the proportion of purchases with price promotions changed over time or differed by household race/ethnicity or income. T-tests were used to compare purchased products' nutritional profiles.

RESULTS

Prevalence of price promotions among packaged food and beverage purchases increased by 8% and 6%, respectively, from 2008 to 2012, with both reaching 34% by 2012. Higher-income households had greater proportions of purchases with price promotions than lower-income households. Asian households had the highest proportion of purchases with any price promotion, followed by non-Hispanic whites. While total price-promoted packaged food purchases had higher mean energy, total sugar, and saturated fat densities than purchases with no price promotions, absolute differences were small.

CONCLUSIONS

Prevalence of price promotions among US household purchases increased from 2008 to 2012 and was greater for higher-income households. No clear associations emerged between presence of price promotions and nutritional quality of purchases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Carolina Population Center, Dept. of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 137 E Franklin St, CB #8120, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA. Electronic address: smithlp@email.unc.edu.Carolina Population Center, Dept. of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 137 E Franklin St, CB #8120, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA.Duke-UNC USDA Center for Behavioral Economics and Healthy Food Choice Research, 140 Science Drive, 230P Gross Hall, Duke University, Box 90989, Durham, NC 27708-0989, USA.Dept. of Economics, University of California, 3207 Social Science Plaza B, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28705473

Citation

Taillie, Lindsey Smith, et al. "Deal or No Deal? the Prevalence and Nutritional Quality of Price Promotions Among U.S. Food and Beverage Purchases." Appetite, vol. 117, 2017, pp. 365-372.
Taillie LS, Ng SW, Xue Y, et al. Deal or no deal? The prevalence and nutritional quality of price promotions among U.S. food and beverage purchases. Appetite. 2017;117:365-372.
Taillie, L. S., Ng, S. W., Xue, Y., & Harding, M. (2017). Deal or no deal? The prevalence and nutritional quality of price promotions among U.S. food and beverage purchases. Appetite, 117, 365-372. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2017.07.006
Taillie LS, et al. Deal or No Deal? the Prevalence and Nutritional Quality of Price Promotions Among U.S. Food and Beverage Purchases. Appetite. 2017 10 1;117:365-372. PubMed PMID: 28705473.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Deal or no deal? The prevalence and nutritional quality of price promotions among U.S. food and beverage purchases. AU - Taillie,Lindsey Smith, AU - Ng,Shu Wen, AU - Xue,Ya, AU - Harding,Matthew, Y1 - 2017/07/10/ PY - 2017/02/24/received PY - 2017/06/27/revised PY - 2017/07/08/accepted PY - 2017/7/15/pubmed PY - 2018/5/4/medline PY - 2017/7/15/entrez KW - Food costs KW - Food marketing KW - Nutrition KW - Packaged foods KW - Price promotions SP - 365 EP - 372 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 117 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examines trends in the prevalence of price promotions among packaged food and beverage purchases, differences in prevalence by household race/ethnicity or income, and the association between price promotions and the nutritional profile of purchases. DESIGN: This cross-sectional study utilizes a dataset of 90 million purchases from 38,744 (2008) to 45,042 (2012) US households in 2008-2012. Chi-square tests were used to examine whether the proportion of purchases with price promotions changed over time or differed by household race/ethnicity or income. T-tests were used to compare purchased products' nutritional profiles. RESULTS: Prevalence of price promotions among packaged food and beverage purchases increased by 8% and 6%, respectively, from 2008 to 2012, with both reaching 34% by 2012. Higher-income households had greater proportions of purchases with price promotions than lower-income households. Asian households had the highest proportion of purchases with any price promotion, followed by non-Hispanic whites. While total price-promoted packaged food purchases had higher mean energy, total sugar, and saturated fat densities than purchases with no price promotions, absolute differences were small. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of price promotions among US household purchases increased from 2008 to 2012 and was greater for higher-income households. No clear associations emerged between presence of price promotions and nutritional quality of purchases. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28705473/Deal_or_no_deal_The_prevalence_and_nutritional_quality_of_price_promotions_among_U_S__food_and_beverage_purchases_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(17)30306-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -