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Increased bone matrix mineralization in treatment-naïve children with inflammatory bowel disease.
Bone. 2017 Dec; 105:50-56.BONE

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects many organ systems including the skeleton. In children with IBD, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover are frequently low. Disturbances in bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) are linked to alterations in bone material strength; however, BMDD has not previously been reported in children with chronic inflammatory disorders. The aim of this study was to characterize BMDD based on quantitative backscatter electron imaging in cancellous (Cn.) and cortical (Ct.) compartments from trans-iliac biopsy samples from a cohort of 20 treatment-naïve children at the time of their IBD diagnosis (12 males, mean age 14.5±2.3years). The outcomes were compared to pediatric reference BMDD data and correlation with revisited biochemical and histomorphometric outcomes was analyzed. BMDD in treatment-naïve children with IBD was shifted toward higher calcium concentrations compared to reference: (i) In cancellous bone, the most frequent calcium concentration (Cn.CaPeak+2.8%, p=0.004) and the portion of highly mineralized bone (Cn.CaHigh+52%, p=0.009) were increased. (ii) In cortical bone, the mineralization heterogeneity (Ct.CaWidth+17.0%, p=0.001) and Ct.CaHigh (+30.4%, p=0.006) were increased. (iii) Furthermore, significant correlations with serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bsALP), and urinary crosslinked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (uNTX) were observed: the higher CaMean (the average calcium concentration), CaPeak and CaHigh, the lower were ALP, bsALP, and uNTX (p-value from <0.001 to 0.05). Children with treatment-naïve IBD have decreased bone turnover leading to a higher bone matrix mineralization density, findings which may contribute to compromised bone strength.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute of Osteology at Hanusch-Hospital of WGKK & Trauma Centre Meidling of AUVA, 1st Medical Department, Hanusch-Hospital, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: barbara.misof@osteologie.at.Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute of Osteology at Hanusch-Hospital of WGKK & Trauma Centre Meidling of AUVA, 1st Medical Department, Hanusch-Hospital, Vienna, Austria.Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute of Osteology at Hanusch-Hospital of WGKK & Trauma Centre Meidling of AUVA, 1st Medical Department, Hanusch-Hospital, Vienna, Austria.Department of Pediatrics, McGill University, Shriners Hospital of Montréal, Montréal, Canada.Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; School of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Inflammatory Bowel Disease Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Department of Paediatrics, University of Ottawa, Canada.Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Department of Paediatrics, University of Ottawa, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28705682

Citation

Misof, Barbara M., et al. "Increased Bone Matrix Mineralization in Treatment-naïve Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease." Bone, vol. 105, 2017, pp. 50-56.
Misof BM, Roschger P, Klaushofer K, et al. Increased bone matrix mineralization in treatment-naïve children with inflammatory bowel disease. Bone. 2017;105:50-56.
Misof, B. M., Roschger, P., Klaushofer, K., Rauch, F., Ma, J., Mack, D. R., & Ward, L. M. (2017). Increased bone matrix mineralization in treatment-naïve children with inflammatory bowel disease. Bone, 105, 50-56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2017.07.011
Misof BM, et al. Increased Bone Matrix Mineralization in Treatment-naïve Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Bone. 2017;105:50-56. PubMed PMID: 28705682.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased bone matrix mineralization in treatment-naïve children with inflammatory bowel disease. AU - Misof,Barbara M, AU - Roschger,Paul, AU - Klaushofer,Klaus, AU - Rauch,Frank, AU - Ma,Jinhui, AU - Mack,David R, AU - Ward,Leanne M, Y1 - 2017/07/10/ PY - 2017/05/05/received PY - 2017/07/05/revised PY - 2017/07/09/accepted PY - 2017/7/15/pubmed PY - 2018/6/12/medline PY - 2017/7/15/entrez KW - Bone biopsy KW - Bone mineralization KW - Children KW - Inflammatory bowel disease KW - Osteoporosis SP - 50 EP - 56 JF - Bone JO - Bone VL - 105 N2 - Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects many organ systems including the skeleton. In children with IBD, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover are frequently low. Disturbances in bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) are linked to alterations in bone material strength; however, BMDD has not previously been reported in children with chronic inflammatory disorders. The aim of this study was to characterize BMDD based on quantitative backscatter electron imaging in cancellous (Cn.) and cortical (Ct.) compartments from trans-iliac biopsy samples from a cohort of 20 treatment-naïve children at the time of their IBD diagnosis (12 males, mean age 14.5±2.3years). The outcomes were compared to pediatric reference BMDD data and correlation with revisited biochemical and histomorphometric outcomes was analyzed. BMDD in treatment-naïve children with IBD was shifted toward higher calcium concentrations compared to reference: (i) In cancellous bone, the most frequent calcium concentration (Cn.CaPeak+2.8%, p=0.004) and the portion of highly mineralized bone (Cn.CaHigh+52%, p=0.009) were increased. (ii) In cortical bone, the mineralization heterogeneity (Ct.CaWidth+17.0%, p=0.001) and Ct.CaHigh (+30.4%, p=0.006) were increased. (iii) Furthermore, significant correlations with serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bsALP), and urinary crosslinked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (uNTX) were observed: the higher CaMean (the average calcium concentration), CaPeak and CaHigh, the lower were ALP, bsALP, and uNTX (p-value from <0.001 to 0.05). Children with treatment-naïve IBD have decreased bone turnover leading to a higher bone matrix mineralization density, findings which may contribute to compromised bone strength. SN - 1873-2763 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28705682/Increased_bone_matrix_mineralization_in_treatment_naïve_children_with_inflammatory_bowel_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S8756-3282(17)30237-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -