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Area-based socioeconomic factors and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among teen boys in the United States.
BMC Public Health. 2017 07 14; 18(1):19.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study is the first to examine associations between several area-based socioeconomic factors and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake among boys in the United States (U.S.).

METHODS

Data from the 2012-2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen restricted-use data were analyzed to examine associations of HPV vaccination initiation (receipt of ≥1 dose) and series completion (receipt of three doses) among boys aged 13-17 years (N = 19,518) with several individual-level and ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA) census measures. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of HPV vaccination initiation and series completion separately.

RESULTS

In 2012-2013 approximately 27.9% (95% CI 26.6%-29.2%) of boys initiated and 10.38% (95% CI 9.48%-11.29%) completed the HPV vaccine series. Area-based poverty was not statistically significantly associated with HPV vaccination initiation. It was, however, associated with series completion, with boys living in high-poverty areas (≥20% of residents living below poverty) having higher odds of completing the series (AOR 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.48) than boys in low-poverty areas (0-4.99%). Interactions between race/ethnicity and ZIP code-level poverty indicated that Hispanic boys living in high-poverty areas had a statistically significantly higher odds of HPV vaccine initiation (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 1.03-1.97) and series completion (AOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.05-2.32) than Hispanic boys in low-poverty areas. Non-Hispanic Black boys in high poverty areas had higher odds of initiation (AOR 2.23, 95% CI 1.33-3.75) and completion (AOR 2.61, 95% CI 1.06-6.44) than non-Hispanic Black boys in low-poverty areas. Rural/urban residence and population density were also significant factors, with boys from urban or densely populated areas having higher odds of initiation and completion compared to boys living in non-urban, less densely populated areas.

CONCLUSION

Higher HPV vaccination coverage in urban areas and among racial/ethnic minorities in areas with high poverty may be attributable to factors such as vaccine acceptance, health-care practices, and their access to HPV vaccines through the Vaccines for Children Program, which provides free vaccines to uninsured and under-insured children. Given the low HPV vaccination rates among boys in the U.S., these results provide important evidence to inform public health interventions to increase HPV vaccination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Geography, Temple University, 115 W. Polett Walk, 308 Gladfelter Hall, Philadelphia, PA, 19122, USA. khenry1@temple.edu. Fox Chase Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention and Control Program, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19111, USA. khenry1@temple.edu.Temple University, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, 3500 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19140, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Rutgers University, Rutgers School of Public Health, 683 Hoes Lane West, Piscataway, NJ, 08854, USA. Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, Cancer Prevention and Control Program, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903, USA.Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Cancer Control and Population Sciences, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA.Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Cancer Control and Population Sciences, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA. University of Utah College of Nursing, 10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28709420

Citation

Henry, Kevin A., et al. "Area-based Socioeconomic Factors and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Among Teen Boys in the United States." BMC Public Health, vol. 18, no. 1, 2017, p. 19.
Henry KA, Swiecki-Sikora AL, Stroup AM, et al. Area-based socioeconomic factors and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among teen boys in the United States. BMC Public Health. 2017;18(1):19.
Henry, K. A., Swiecki-Sikora, A. L., Stroup, A. M., Warner, E. L., & Kepka, D. (2017). Area-based socioeconomic factors and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among teen boys in the United States. BMC Public Health, 18(1), 19. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-4567-2
Henry KA, et al. Area-based Socioeconomic Factors and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Among Teen Boys in the United States. BMC Public Health. 2017 07 14;18(1):19. PubMed PMID: 28709420.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Area-based socioeconomic factors and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among teen boys in the United States. AU - Henry,Kevin A, AU - Swiecki-Sikora,Allison L, AU - Stroup,Antoinette M, AU - Warner,Echo L, AU - Kepka,Deanna, Y1 - 2017/07/14/ PY - 2016/12/22/received PY - 2017/07/05/accepted PY - 2017/7/16/entrez PY - 2017/7/16/pubmed PY - 2018/1/18/medline KW - Cancer prevention KW - Cervical cancer KW - Geographic factors KW - HPV vaccination KW - Health disparities KW - Human papillomavirus SP - 19 EP - 19 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: This study is the first to examine associations between several area-based socioeconomic factors and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake among boys in the United States (U.S.). METHODS: Data from the 2012-2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen restricted-use data were analyzed to examine associations of HPV vaccination initiation (receipt of ≥1 dose) and series completion (receipt of three doses) among boys aged 13-17 years (N = 19,518) with several individual-level and ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA) census measures. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of HPV vaccination initiation and series completion separately. RESULTS: In 2012-2013 approximately 27.9% (95% CI 26.6%-29.2%) of boys initiated and 10.38% (95% CI 9.48%-11.29%) completed the HPV vaccine series. Area-based poverty was not statistically significantly associated with HPV vaccination initiation. It was, however, associated with series completion, with boys living in high-poverty areas (≥20% of residents living below poverty) having higher odds of completing the series (AOR 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.48) than boys in low-poverty areas (0-4.99%). Interactions between race/ethnicity and ZIP code-level poverty indicated that Hispanic boys living in high-poverty areas had a statistically significantly higher odds of HPV vaccine initiation (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 1.03-1.97) and series completion (AOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.05-2.32) than Hispanic boys in low-poverty areas. Non-Hispanic Black boys in high poverty areas had higher odds of initiation (AOR 2.23, 95% CI 1.33-3.75) and completion (AOR 2.61, 95% CI 1.06-6.44) than non-Hispanic Black boys in low-poverty areas. Rural/urban residence and population density were also significant factors, with boys from urban or densely populated areas having higher odds of initiation and completion compared to boys living in non-urban, less densely populated areas. CONCLUSION: Higher HPV vaccination coverage in urban areas and among racial/ethnic minorities in areas with high poverty may be attributable to factors such as vaccine acceptance, health-care practices, and their access to HPV vaccines through the Vaccines for Children Program, which provides free vaccines to uninsured and under-insured children. Given the low HPV vaccination rates among boys in the U.S., these results provide important evidence to inform public health interventions to increase HPV vaccination. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28709420/Area_based_socioeconomic_factors_and_Human_Papillomavirus__HPV__vaccination_among_teen_boys_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-017-4567-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -