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The effect of early feeding practices on growth indices and obesity at preschool children from four European countries and UK schoolchildren and adolescents.
Eur J Pediatr. 2017 Sep; 176(9):1181-1192.EJ

Abstract

Not only healthy growth but also childhood obesity partly originate from early life. The current work aimed to examine the association of feeding practices during infancy with growth and adiposity indices in preschool children from four European countries and in UK schoolchildren and adolescents. Existing data from four European birth cohorts (ALSPAC-UK, EDEN-France, EuroPrevall-Greece and Generation XXI-Portugal) were used. Anthropometrics and body composition indices were collected. Parallel multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the research hypothesis. Overall, the analyses showed that breastfeeding and timing of complementary feeding were not consistently associated with height z-score, overweight/obesity, and body fat mass in children or adolescents. However, breastfeeding duration for less than 6 months was associated with lower height z-scores in 5-year-old French children (P < 0.001) but with higher height z-scores in 4-year-old UK children (P = 0.006). Furthermore, introduction of complementary foods earlier than 4 months of age was positively associated with fat mass levels in 5-year-old French children (P = 0.026).

CONCLUSION

Early feeding practices, i.e., any breastfeeding duration and age of introduction of complementary foods, do not appear to be consistently associated with height z-score, overweight/obesity, and body fat mass in preschool children from four European countries and in UK schoolchildren and adolescents. What is known? • Healthy growth and childhood obesity partly originate from early life. What is new? • Breastfeeding duration less than 6 months was associated with lower height z-scores in 5-year-old French children, while the opposite was observed in 4-year-old British children. • Introduction of complementary foods earlier than 4 months was positively associated with fat mass levels in 5-year-old French children, but not in the other three countries. • Early feeding practices did not appear to be consistently associated with growth and adiposity indices, and as such, no clear influence can be observed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, 70, El.Venizelou Ave, 17671 Kallithea, Athens, Greece.INSERM, UMR1153 Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité Center (CRESS), Early Determinants of the Child's Health and Development Team (ORCHAD), 75014, Paris, France. Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Predictive Medicine and Public Health, University of Porto Medical School, Portugal and Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, 70, El.Venizelou Ave, 17671 Kallithea, Athens, Greece.Department of Allergy, 2nd Pediatric Clinic, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.INSERM, UMR1153 Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité Center (CRESS), Early Determinants of the Child's Health and Development Team (ORCHAD), 75014, Paris, France. Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.Portugal and Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Predictive Medicine and Public Health, University of Porto Medical School, Portugal and Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.INSERM, UMR1153 Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité Center (CRESS), Early Determinants of the Child's Health and Development Team (ORCHAD), 75014, Paris, France. Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, 70, El.Venizelou Ave, 17671 Kallithea, Athens, Greece. manios@hua.gr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28711955

Citation

Moschonis, George, et al. "The Effect of Early Feeding Practices On Growth Indices and Obesity at Preschool Children From Four European Countries and UK Schoolchildren and Adolescents." European Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 176, no. 9, 2017, pp. 1181-1192.
Moschonis G, de Lauzon-Guillain B, Jones L, et al. The effect of early feeding practices on growth indices and obesity at preschool children from four European countries and UK schoolchildren and adolescents. Eur J Pediatr. 2017;176(9):1181-1192.
Moschonis, G., de Lauzon-Guillain, B., Jones, L., Oliveira, A., Lambrinou, C. P., Damianidi, L., Lioret, S., Moreira, P., Lopes, C., Emmett, P., Charles, M. A., & Manios, Y. (2017). The effect of early feeding practices on growth indices and obesity at preschool children from four European countries and UK schoolchildren and adolescents. European Journal of Pediatrics, 176(9), 1181-1192. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00431-017-2961-5
Moschonis G, et al. The Effect of Early Feeding Practices On Growth Indices and Obesity at Preschool Children From Four European Countries and UK Schoolchildren and Adolescents. Eur J Pediatr. 2017;176(9):1181-1192. PubMed PMID: 28711955.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of early feeding practices on growth indices and obesity at preschool children from four European countries and UK schoolchildren and adolescents. AU - Moschonis,George, AU - de Lauzon-Guillain,Blandine, AU - Jones,Louise, AU - Oliveira,Andreia, AU - Lambrinou,Christina-Paulina, AU - Damianidi,Louiza, AU - Lioret,Sandrine, AU - Moreira,Pedro, AU - Lopes,Carla, AU - Emmett,Pauline, AU - Charles,Marie Aline, AU - Manios,Yannis, Y1 - 2017/07/15/ PY - 2016/04/22/received PY - 2017/06/30/accepted PY - 2017/05/29/revised PY - 2017/7/18/pubmed PY - 2018/5/15/medline PY - 2017/7/17/entrez KW - Birth cohort KW - Breastfeeding KW - Complementary feeding KW - Growth KW - Obesity KW - Preschool children SP - 1181 EP - 1192 JF - European journal of pediatrics JO - Eur J Pediatr VL - 176 IS - 9 N2 - : Not only healthy growth but also childhood obesity partly originate from early life. The current work aimed to examine the association of feeding practices during infancy with growth and adiposity indices in preschool children from four European countries and in UK schoolchildren and adolescents. Existing data from four European birth cohorts (ALSPAC-UK, EDEN-France, EuroPrevall-Greece and Generation XXI-Portugal) were used. Anthropometrics and body composition indices were collected. Parallel multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the research hypothesis. Overall, the analyses showed that breastfeeding and timing of complementary feeding were not consistently associated with height z-score, overweight/obesity, and body fat mass in children or adolescents. However, breastfeeding duration for less than 6 months was associated with lower height z-scores in 5-year-old French children (P < 0.001) but with higher height z-scores in 4-year-old UK children (P = 0.006). Furthermore, introduction of complementary foods earlier than 4 months of age was positively associated with fat mass levels in 5-year-old French children (P = 0.026). CONCLUSION: Early feeding practices, i.e., any breastfeeding duration and age of introduction of complementary foods, do not appear to be consistently associated with height z-score, overweight/obesity, and body fat mass in preschool children from four European countries and in UK schoolchildren and adolescents. What is known? • Healthy growth and childhood obesity partly originate from early life. What is new? • Breastfeeding duration less than 6 months was associated with lower height z-scores in 5-year-old French children, while the opposite was observed in 4-year-old British children. • Introduction of complementary foods earlier than 4 months was positively associated with fat mass levels in 5-year-old French children, but not in the other three countries. • Early feeding practices did not appear to be consistently associated with growth and adiposity indices, and as such, no clear influence can be observed. SN - 1432-1076 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28711955/The_effect_of_early_feeding_practices_on_growth_indices_and_obesity_at_preschool_children_from_four_European_countries_and_UK_schoolchildren_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-017-2961-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -