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Maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index, gestational weight gain influence birth weight.
Women Birth. 2018 Feb; 31(1):e20-e25.WB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence suggests that pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain have impact on pregnancy and birth weight, yet whether maternal gestational weight gain has a differential effect on the rates of adverse birth weight among women with different pre-pregnancy body mass index categories are unknown.

METHODS

We selected 1617 children matched with their mothers as study subjects. The subjects were divided into three categories: weight gain below the American Institute of Medicine guidelines, weight gain within the American Institute of Medicine guidelines and weight gain above the American Institute of Medicine guidelines.

RESULTS

The prevalence of pre-pregnancy underweight and overweight/obese women was 16.3% and 12.3%. And nearly 15.2% of the women had gestational weight gain below American Institute of Medicine guideline, 52.1% of the women had gestational weight gain above American Institute of Medicine guideline. Maternal overweight and obese was associated with increased risk for macrosomia and large-for-gestational age. Women had gestational weight gain below American Institute of Medicine guideline were more likely to have low birth weight and small-for-gestational age than women who had gestational weight gain within American Institute of Medicine guideline. Furthermore, the risks for macrosomia and large-for-gestational age were increased in women with above American Institute of Medicine guideline. And for women with a normal weight before pregnancy, gestational weight gain above the American Institute of Medicine guidelines were associated with higher rates of macrosomia and large-for-gestational age, compared with the women of similar pre-pregnancy weight category but with gestational weight gain within the American Institute of Medicine guidelines.

CONCLUSIONS

Women with abnormal pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain are at risk for adverse birth weight outcomes. Moreover, gestational weight gain has a differential effect on the rates of adverse birth weight outcomes between women of different pre-pregnancy body mass index categories.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Maternal and Child Health Care, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, China.Department of Maternal and Child Health Care, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, China.Department of Maternal and Child Health Care, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, China.Department of Microbiology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, China. Electronic address: huangshh68@aliyun.com.Department of Maternal and Child Health Care, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, China. Electronic address: xiujingcao@yeah.net.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28716548

Citation

Zhao, R, et al. "Maternal Pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index, Gestational Weight Gain Influence Birth Weight." Women and Birth : Journal of the Australian College of Midwives, vol. 31, no. 1, 2018, pp. e20-e25.
Zhao R, Xu L, Wu ML, et al. Maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index, gestational weight gain influence birth weight. Women Birth. 2018;31(1):e20-e25.
Zhao, R., Xu, L., Wu, M. L., Huang, S. H., & Cao, X. J. (2018). Maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index, gestational weight gain influence birth weight. Women and Birth : Journal of the Australian College of Midwives, 31(1), e20-e25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2017.06.003
Zhao R, et al. Maternal Pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index, Gestational Weight Gain Influence Birth Weight. Women Birth. 2018;31(1):e20-e25. PubMed PMID: 28716548.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index, gestational weight gain influence birth weight. AU - Zhao,R, AU - Xu,L, AU - Wu,M L, AU - Huang,S H, AU - Cao,X J, Y1 - 2017/07/14/ PY - 2017/03/26/received PY - 2017/06/04/revised PY - 2017/06/06/accepted PY - 2017/7/19/pubmed PY - 2018/7/26/medline PY - 2017/7/19/entrez KW - Birth weight KW - Gestational weight gain (GWG) KW - LGA KW - Pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) KW - SGA SP - e20 EP - e25 JF - Women and birth : journal of the Australian College of Midwives JO - Women Birth VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain have impact on pregnancy and birth weight, yet whether maternal gestational weight gain has a differential effect on the rates of adverse birth weight among women with different pre-pregnancy body mass index categories are unknown. METHODS: We selected 1617 children matched with their mothers as study subjects. The subjects were divided into three categories: weight gain below the American Institute of Medicine guidelines, weight gain within the American Institute of Medicine guidelines and weight gain above the American Institute of Medicine guidelines. RESULTS: The prevalence of pre-pregnancy underweight and overweight/obese women was 16.3% and 12.3%. And nearly 15.2% of the women had gestational weight gain below American Institute of Medicine guideline, 52.1% of the women had gestational weight gain above American Institute of Medicine guideline. Maternal overweight and obese was associated with increased risk for macrosomia and large-for-gestational age. Women had gestational weight gain below American Institute of Medicine guideline were more likely to have low birth weight and small-for-gestational age than women who had gestational weight gain within American Institute of Medicine guideline. Furthermore, the risks for macrosomia and large-for-gestational age were increased in women with above American Institute of Medicine guideline. And for women with a normal weight before pregnancy, gestational weight gain above the American Institute of Medicine guidelines were associated with higher rates of macrosomia and large-for-gestational age, compared with the women of similar pre-pregnancy weight category but with gestational weight gain within the American Institute of Medicine guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: Women with abnormal pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain are at risk for adverse birth weight outcomes. Moreover, gestational weight gain has a differential effect on the rates of adverse birth weight outcomes between women of different pre-pregnancy body mass index categories. SN - 1878-1799 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28716548/Maternal_pre_pregnancy_body_mass_index_gestational_weight_gain_influence_birth_weight_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1871-5192(17)30124-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -