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Microbial and genetically engineered oils as replacements for fish oil in aquaculture feeds.
Biotechnol Lett. 2017 Nov; 39(11):1599-1609.BL

Abstract

As the global population grows more of our fish and seafood are being farmed. Fish are the main dietary source of the omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, but these cannot be produced in sufficient quantities as are now required for human health. Farmed fish have traditionally been fed a diet consisting of fishmeal and fish oil, rich in n-3 LC-PUFA. However, the increase in global aquaculture production has resulted in these finite and limited marine ingredients being replaced with sustainable alternatives of terrestrial origin that are devoid of n-3 LC-PUFA. Consequently, the nutritional value of the final product has been partially compromised with EPA and DHA levels both falling. Recent calls from the salmon industry for new sources of n-3 LC-PUFA have received significant commercial interest. Thus, this review explores the technologies being applied to produce de novo n-3 LC-PUFA sources, namely microalgae and genetically engineered oilseed crops, and how they may be used in aquafeeds to ensure that farmed fish remain a healthy component of the human diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Aquaculture, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK. matthew.sprague@stir.ac.uk.Institute of Aquaculture, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK.Institute of Aquaculture, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28721583

Citation

Sprague, M, et al. "Microbial and Genetically Engineered Oils as Replacements for Fish Oil in Aquaculture Feeds." Biotechnology Letters, vol. 39, no. 11, 2017, pp. 1599-1609.
Sprague M, Betancor MB, Tocher DR. Microbial and genetically engineered oils as replacements for fish oil in aquaculture feeds. Biotechnol Lett. 2017;39(11):1599-1609.
Sprague, M., Betancor, M. B., & Tocher, D. R. (2017). Microbial and genetically engineered oils as replacements for fish oil in aquaculture feeds. Biotechnology Letters, 39(11), 1599-1609. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10529-017-2402-6
Sprague M, Betancor MB, Tocher DR. Microbial and Genetically Engineered Oils as Replacements for Fish Oil in Aquaculture Feeds. Biotechnol Lett. 2017;39(11):1599-1609. PubMed PMID: 28721583.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbial and genetically engineered oils as replacements for fish oil in aquaculture feeds. AU - Sprague,M, AU - Betancor,M B, AU - Tocher,D R, Y1 - 2017/07/18/ PY - 2017/06/22/received PY - 2017/07/13/accepted PY - 2017/7/20/pubmed PY - 2018/7/3/medline PY - 2017/7/20/entrez KW - Alternative n-3 LC-PUFA sources KW - Aquaculture KW - EPA and DHA KW - Farmed Fish KW - Human health KW - Oils from transgenic plants KW - Polyunsaturated fatty acids SP - 1599 EP - 1609 JF - Biotechnology letters JO - Biotechnol. Lett. VL - 39 IS - 11 N2 - As the global population grows more of our fish and seafood are being farmed. Fish are the main dietary source of the omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, but these cannot be produced in sufficient quantities as are now required for human health. Farmed fish have traditionally been fed a diet consisting of fishmeal and fish oil, rich in n-3 LC-PUFA. However, the increase in global aquaculture production has resulted in these finite and limited marine ingredients being replaced with sustainable alternatives of terrestrial origin that are devoid of n-3 LC-PUFA. Consequently, the nutritional value of the final product has been partially compromised with EPA and DHA levels both falling. Recent calls from the salmon industry for new sources of n-3 LC-PUFA have received significant commercial interest. Thus, this review explores the technologies being applied to produce de novo n-3 LC-PUFA sources, namely microalgae and genetically engineered oilseed crops, and how they may be used in aquafeeds to ensure that farmed fish remain a healthy component of the human diet. SN - 1573-6776 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28721583/Microbial_and_genetically_engineered_oils_as_replacements_for_fish_oil_in_aquaculture_feeds_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10529-017-2402-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -