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Association between PM2.5 and PM2.5 Constituents and Preterm Delivery in California, 2000-2006.
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2017 09; 31(5):424-434.PP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Particulate matter (PM) has been documented to contribute to preterm delivery. However, few studies have investigated the relationships between individual constituents of fine PM (PM2.5) and preterm delivery, and factors that may modify their associations.

METHODS

In this study, we examined the associations between several prenatal exposure metrics to PM2.5 and 23 constituents of PM2.5 and preterm delivery in California from 2000 to 2006. In a retrospective cohort study including 231 637 births, we conducted logistic regression analyses adjusting for maternal, infant, temporal, geographic, and neighbourhood characteristics.

RESULTS

We observed increased risk for preterm delivery with full-gestational exposure for several PM2.5 constituents. Per interquartile range increase, ammonium (21.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 17.1, 25.4), nitrate (18.1%, 95% CI 14.9, 21.4) and bromine (16.7%, 95% CI 13.2, 20.3) had some of the largest increased risks. Alternatively, some PM2.5 constituents were inversely associated with preterm delivery, including chlorine (-8.2%, 95% CI -10.3, -6.0), sodium (-13.2%, 95% CI -15.2, -11.3), sodium ion (-11.9%, 95% CI -14.1, -9.6) and vanadium (-19.2%, 95% CI -25.3, -12.6). Greater associations between PM2.5 constituents and preterm delivery were observed for Blacks and Asians, older mothers, and those with some college education compared to their reference groups, as well as for births with gestational ages from 32 to 34 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS

PM2.5 constituents ammonium, nitrate and bromine, often linked to traffic and biomass combustion, were most associated with increased risk of preterm delivery in California. Certain demographic subgroups may be particularly impacted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Air and Climate Epidemiology Section, California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Oakland, CA.Air and Climate Epidemiology Section, California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Oakland, CA.Air and Climate Epidemiology Section, California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Oakland, CA.Air and Climate Epidemiology Section, California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Oakland, CA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28732119

Citation

Basu, Rupa, et al. "Association Between PM2.5 and PM2.5 Constituents and Preterm Delivery in California, 2000-2006." Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, vol. 31, no. 5, 2017, pp. 424-434.
Basu R, Pearson D, Ebisu K, et al. Association between PM2.5 and PM2.5 Constituents and Preterm Delivery in California, 2000-2006. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2017;31(5):424-434.
Basu, R., Pearson, D., Ebisu, K., & Malig, B. (2017). Association between PM2.5 and PM2.5 Constituents and Preterm Delivery in California, 2000-2006. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 31(5), 424-434. https://doi.org/10.1111/ppe.12380
Basu R, et al. Association Between PM2.5 and PM2.5 Constituents and Preterm Delivery in California, 2000-2006. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2017;31(5):424-434. PubMed PMID: 28732119.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between PM2.5 and PM2.5 Constituents and Preterm Delivery in California, 2000-2006. AU - Basu,Rupa, AU - Pearson,Dharshani, AU - Ebisu,Keita, AU - Malig,Brian, Y1 - 2017/07/21/ PY - 2017/7/22/pubmed PY - 2018/7/3/medline PY - 2017/7/22/entrez KW - California KW - adverse birth outcomes KW - air pollution KW - components KW - constituents KW - epidemiology KW - fine particles KW - preterm delivery KW - species SP - 424 EP - 434 JF - Paediatric and perinatal epidemiology JO - Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol VL - 31 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Particulate matter (PM) has been documented to contribute to preterm delivery. However, few studies have investigated the relationships between individual constituents of fine PM (PM2.5) and preterm delivery, and factors that may modify their associations. METHODS: In this study, we examined the associations between several prenatal exposure metrics to PM2.5 and 23 constituents of PM2.5 and preterm delivery in California from 2000 to 2006. In a retrospective cohort study including 231 637 births, we conducted logistic regression analyses adjusting for maternal, infant, temporal, geographic, and neighbourhood characteristics. RESULTS: We observed increased risk for preterm delivery with full-gestational exposure for several PM2.5 constituents. Per interquartile range increase, ammonium (21.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 17.1, 25.4), nitrate (18.1%, 95% CI 14.9, 21.4) and bromine (16.7%, 95% CI 13.2, 20.3) had some of the largest increased risks. Alternatively, some PM2.5 constituents were inversely associated with preterm delivery, including chlorine (-8.2%, 95% CI -10.3, -6.0), sodium (-13.2%, 95% CI -15.2, -11.3), sodium ion (-11.9%, 95% CI -14.1, -9.6) and vanadium (-19.2%, 95% CI -25.3, -12.6). Greater associations between PM2.5 constituents and preterm delivery were observed for Blacks and Asians, older mothers, and those with some college education compared to their reference groups, as well as for births with gestational ages from 32 to 34 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: PM2.5 constituents ammonium, nitrate and bromine, often linked to traffic and biomass combustion, were most associated with increased risk of preterm delivery in California. Certain demographic subgroups may be particularly impacted. SN - 1365-3016 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28732119/Association_between_PM2_5_and_PM2_5_Constituents_and_Preterm_Delivery_in_California_2000_2006_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ppe.12380 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -