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A Model of Collaborative Spiritual and Psychiatric Care of Oncology Patients.
Psychosomatics 2017 Nov - Dec; 58(6):614-623P

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many oncology patients see both chaplains and consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatrists during medical hospitalizations. Studies show that spirituality and mental health influence one another, and that patients often prefer that physicians understand their spirituality. Though models of inpatient chaplaincy-psychiatry collaboration likely exist, none are apparent in the literature. In this study, we present one model of chaplaincy-psychiatry collaboration, hypothesizing that both specialties would find the intervention helpful.

METHODS

From April through December 2015, the C-L psychiatry service at Brigham & Women's Hospital piloted 13 sessions of interdisciplinary rounds, where chaplains and C-L psychiatrists discussed common oncology patients. Participants completed questionnaires including quantitative and qualitative prompts before the intervention, after each session, and at the study's conclusion.

RESULTS

Eighteen individuals completed baseline questionnaires. Between baseline and final surveys, the proportion of participants describing themselves as "very satisfied" with the 2 services' integration rose from 0-36%. The proportion of participants feeling "not comfortable" addressing issues in the other discipline declined from 17-0%. The most frequently chosen options on how discussions had been helpful were that they had enhanced understanding of both patient needs (83.3%) and the other discipline (78.6%). Qualitative data yielded similar themes. At conclusion, all respondents expressed preference that interdisciplinary rounds continue.

CONCLUSION

This study describes a model of enhancing collaboration between chaplains and C-L psychiatrists, an intervention not previously studied to our knowledge. A pilot intervention of the model was perceived by both specialties to enhance both patient care and understanding of the other discipline.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry (L.E.K., H.N.L., J.R.P.), Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. Electronic address: Larkin.Kao@gmail.com.Department of Psychiatry (L.E.K., H.N.L., J.R.P.), Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.Department of Spiritual Care Services (K.G., V.O.), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.Department of Spiritual Care Services (K.G., V.O.), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.Department of Psychiatry (L.E.K., H.N.L., J.R.P.), Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28734556

Citation

Kao, Larkin Elderon, et al. "A Model of Collaborative Spiritual and Psychiatric Care of Oncology Patients." Psychosomatics, vol. 58, no. 6, 2017, pp. 614-623.
Kao LE, Lokko HN, Gallivan K, et al. A Model of Collaborative Spiritual and Psychiatric Care of Oncology Patients. Psychosomatics. 2017;58(6):614-623.
Kao, L. E., Lokko, H. N., Gallivan, K., O'Brien, V., & Peteet, J. R. (2017). A Model of Collaborative Spiritual and Psychiatric Care of Oncology Patients. Psychosomatics, 58(6), pp. 614-623. doi:10.1016/j.psym.2017.06.004.
Kao LE, et al. A Model of Collaborative Spiritual and Psychiatric Care of Oncology Patients. Psychosomatics. 2017;58(6):614-623. PubMed PMID: 28734556.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Model of Collaborative Spiritual and Psychiatric Care of Oncology Patients. AU - Kao,Larkin Elderon, AU - Lokko,Hermioni N, AU - Gallivan,Kathleen, AU - O'Brien,Vera, AU - Peteet,John R, Y1 - 2017/06/23/ PY - 2017/06/01/received PY - 2017/06/20/revised PY - 2017/06/21/accepted PY - 2017/7/25/pubmed PY - 2018/8/8/medline PY - 2017/7/24/entrez KW - chaplaincy KW - consultation-liaison psychiatry KW - psycho-oncology KW - religion KW - spirituality SP - 614 EP - 623 JF - Psychosomatics JO - Psychosomatics VL - 58 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Many oncology patients see both chaplains and consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatrists during medical hospitalizations. Studies show that spirituality and mental health influence one another, and that patients often prefer that physicians understand their spirituality. Though models of inpatient chaplaincy-psychiatry collaboration likely exist, none are apparent in the literature. In this study, we present one model of chaplaincy-psychiatry collaboration, hypothesizing that both specialties would find the intervention helpful. METHODS: From April through December 2015, the C-L psychiatry service at Brigham & Women's Hospital piloted 13 sessions of interdisciplinary rounds, where chaplains and C-L psychiatrists discussed common oncology patients. Participants completed questionnaires including quantitative and qualitative prompts before the intervention, after each session, and at the study's conclusion. RESULTS: Eighteen individuals completed baseline questionnaires. Between baseline and final surveys, the proportion of participants describing themselves as "very satisfied" with the 2 services' integration rose from 0-36%. The proportion of participants feeling "not comfortable" addressing issues in the other discipline declined from 17-0%. The most frequently chosen options on how discussions had been helpful were that they had enhanced understanding of both patient needs (83.3%) and the other discipline (78.6%). Qualitative data yielded similar themes. At conclusion, all respondents expressed preference that interdisciplinary rounds continue. CONCLUSION: This study describes a model of enhancing collaboration between chaplains and C-L psychiatrists, an intervention not previously studied to our knowledge. A pilot intervention of the model was perceived by both specialties to enhance both patient care and understanding of the other discipline. SN - 1545-7206 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28734556/A_Model_of_Collaborative_Spiritual_and_Psychiatric_Care_of_Oncology_Patients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0033-3182(17)30153-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -