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Patterns of Use of Human Papillomavirus and Other Adolescent Vaccines in the United States.
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Sep; 61(3):281-287.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of the study was to describe the patterns of use of universally recommended adolescent vaccines in the United States.

METHODS

We identified 11-year-olds using the MarketScan insurance claims database (2009-2014). Human papillomavirus (HPV), tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap), and meningococcal (MenACWY) vaccination claims were identified using diagnosis and procedure codes. Generalized linear models estimated vaccination incidence rates and correlates of adolescent vaccination and timely vaccination.

RESULTS

Among 1,691,223 adolescents, receipt of Tdap (52.1%) and MenACWY (45.8%) vaccinations exceeded receipt of HPV vaccination (18.4%). While both sexes had similar Tdap and MenACWY vaccination proportions, girls received HPV vaccination more frequently than boys (21.9% vs. 15.1%). Adolescents received HPV vaccination later (mean age: 11.8 years) than Tdap or MenACWY vaccination (mean age: 11.2 years for both). Half of vaccinated adolescents received Tdap and MenACWY vaccination only; however, coadministration with HPV vaccine increased with birth cohort. Western adolescents had the highest incidence rates of HPV vaccination, and Southern adolescents had the lowest. Rural adolescents were less likely than urban adolescents to receive each vaccination except in the Northeast, where they were more likely to receive HPV vaccination (incidence rate ratio: 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.2005-1.13). Timely HPV vaccination was associated with female sex, urbanicity, Western residence, and later birth cohort.

CONCLUSIONS

HPV vaccination occurred later than Tdap or MenACWY vaccination and was less frequent in boys and rural adolescents. Girls, Western and urban residents, and younger birth cohorts were more likely to receive timely HPV vaccination. Vaccine coadministration increased over time and may encourage timely and complete vaccination coverage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address: nadjavielot@unc.edu.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri; Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28739327

Citation

Vielot, Nadja A., et al. "Patterns of Use of Human Papillomavirus and Other Adolescent Vaccines in the United States." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 61, no. 3, 2017, pp. 281-287.
Vielot NA, Butler AM, Brookhart MA, et al. Patterns of Use of Human Papillomavirus and Other Adolescent Vaccines in the United States. J Adolesc Health. 2017;61(3):281-287.
Vielot, N. A., Butler, A. M., Brookhart, M. A., Becker-Dreps, S., & Smith, J. S. (2017). Patterns of Use of Human Papillomavirus and Other Adolescent Vaccines in the United States. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 61(3), 281-287. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.05.016
Vielot NA, et al. Patterns of Use of Human Papillomavirus and Other Adolescent Vaccines in the United States. J Adolesc Health. 2017;61(3):281-287. PubMed PMID: 28739327.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patterns of Use of Human Papillomavirus and Other Adolescent Vaccines in the United States. AU - Vielot,Nadja A, AU - Butler,Anne M, AU - Brookhart,M Alan, AU - Becker-Dreps,Sylvia, AU - Smith,Jennifer S, Y1 - 2017/07/22/ PY - 2017/02/14/received PY - 2017/05/08/revised PY - 2017/05/08/accepted PY - 2017/7/26/pubmed PY - 2018/6/5/medline PY - 2017/7/26/entrez KW - Adolescents KW - Coadministration KW - Health care providers KW - Human papillomavirus KW - Meningococcal conjugate vaccine KW - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccine KW - Vaccination SP - 281 EP - 287 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 61 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to describe the patterns of use of universally recommended adolescent vaccines in the United States. METHODS: We identified 11-year-olds using the MarketScan insurance claims database (2009-2014). Human papillomavirus (HPV), tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap), and meningococcal (MenACWY) vaccination claims were identified using diagnosis and procedure codes. Generalized linear models estimated vaccination incidence rates and correlates of adolescent vaccination and timely vaccination. RESULTS: Among 1,691,223 adolescents, receipt of Tdap (52.1%) and MenACWY (45.8%) vaccinations exceeded receipt of HPV vaccination (18.4%). While both sexes had similar Tdap and MenACWY vaccination proportions, girls received HPV vaccination more frequently than boys (21.9% vs. 15.1%). Adolescents received HPV vaccination later (mean age: 11.8 years) than Tdap or MenACWY vaccination (mean age: 11.2 years for both). Half of vaccinated adolescents received Tdap and MenACWY vaccination only; however, coadministration with HPV vaccine increased with birth cohort. Western adolescents had the highest incidence rates of HPV vaccination, and Southern adolescents had the lowest. Rural adolescents were less likely than urban adolescents to receive each vaccination except in the Northeast, where they were more likely to receive HPV vaccination (incidence rate ratio: 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.2005-1.13). Timely HPV vaccination was associated with female sex, urbanicity, Western residence, and later birth cohort. CONCLUSIONS: HPV vaccination occurred later than Tdap or MenACWY vaccination and was less frequent in boys and rural adolescents. Girls, Western and urban residents, and younger birth cohorts were more likely to receive timely HPV vaccination. Vaccine coadministration increased over time and may encourage timely and complete vaccination coverage. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28739327/Patterns_of_Use_of_Human_Papillomavirus_and_Other_Adolescent_Vaccines_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(17)30221-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -