Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Psychological scales as predictors of emergency department hospitalizations in suicide attempters.
Am J Emerg Med. 2018 Jan; 36(1):93-99.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychological scales reflecting lethality and intent as predictors of suicide attempter's hospitalization.

METHODS

Data of suicide attempters aged over 15years, who visited the ED from January 2013 to June 2016, were retrospectively collected and they were divided into the hospitalization and discharge groups. We evaluated the Risk-Rescue Rating Scale (RRRS) and Self-Inflicted Injury Severity Form (SIISF) for lethality and Suicide Intent Scale (SIS) for intent, respectively. The predictive abilities of these scales for hospitalization were compared in terms of performance (AUCs) and goodness-of-fit (the Bayesian information criterion [BIC]).

RESULTS

A total of 382 suicide attempters were enrolled, of which 233 (61%) were hospitalized. The scores of all psychological scales were significantly higher in the hospitalization group and all scales were identified as independent predictors of hospitalization. The AUC of the RRRS tended to be higher than those of the SIS and SIISF; similarly, the RRRS demonstrated the best overall fit (the lowest BIC). The AUC of combined the RRRS and SIS was superior to that of any of the individual scales alone. While the AUC of combined the SIISF and SIS was superior to that of either individual scale, it was comparable to that of the RRRS.

CONCLUSIONS

The psychological scales can be helpful for predicting suicide attempter's hospitalization in emergency settings. Especially, the RRRS seemed to have a superior predictive ability. Moreover, combining the scales had significantly better predictive performance than use of the individual scale alone did.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Emergency Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Emergency Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: fly10bird@gmail.com.Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28743477

Citation

Kim, Dae Woong, et al. "Psychological Scales as Predictors of Emergency Department Hospitalizations in Suicide Attempters." The American Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 36, no. 1, 2018, pp. 93-99.
Kim DW, Jeong KY, Kim KS. Psychological scales as predictors of emergency department hospitalizations in suicide attempters. Am J Emerg Med. 2018;36(1):93-99.
Kim, D. W., Jeong, K. Y., & Kim, K. S. (2018). Psychological scales as predictors of emergency department hospitalizations in suicide attempters. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 36(1), 93-99. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2017.07.038
Kim DW, Jeong KY, Kim KS. Psychological Scales as Predictors of Emergency Department Hospitalizations in Suicide Attempters. Am J Emerg Med. 2018;36(1):93-99. PubMed PMID: 28743477.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychological scales as predictors of emergency department hospitalizations in suicide attempters. AU - Kim,Dae Woong, AU - Jeong,Ki Young, AU - Kim,Kyung Su, Y1 - 2017/07/13/ PY - 2017/05/09/received PY - 2017/07/07/revised PY - 2017/07/12/accepted PY - 2017/7/27/pubmed PY - 2017/12/27/medline PY - 2017/7/27/entrez KW - Attempted suicide KW - Emergency departments KW - Hospitalizations KW - Intent KW - Lethality KW - Scales SP - 93 EP - 99 JF - The American journal of emergency medicine JO - Am J Emerg Med VL - 36 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychological scales reflecting lethality and intent as predictors of suicide attempter's hospitalization. METHODS: Data of suicide attempters aged over 15years, who visited the ED from January 2013 to June 2016, were retrospectively collected and they were divided into the hospitalization and discharge groups. We evaluated the Risk-Rescue Rating Scale (RRRS) and Self-Inflicted Injury Severity Form (SIISF) for lethality and Suicide Intent Scale (SIS) for intent, respectively. The predictive abilities of these scales for hospitalization were compared in terms of performance (AUCs) and goodness-of-fit (the Bayesian information criterion [BIC]). RESULTS: A total of 382 suicide attempters were enrolled, of which 233 (61%) were hospitalized. The scores of all psychological scales were significantly higher in the hospitalization group and all scales were identified as independent predictors of hospitalization. The AUC of the RRRS tended to be higher than those of the SIS and SIISF; similarly, the RRRS demonstrated the best overall fit (the lowest BIC). The AUC of combined the RRRS and SIS was superior to that of any of the individual scales alone. While the AUC of combined the SIISF and SIS was superior to that of either individual scale, it was comparable to that of the RRRS. CONCLUSIONS: The psychological scales can be helpful for predicting suicide attempter's hospitalization in emergency settings. Especially, the RRRS seemed to have a superior predictive ability. Moreover, combining the scales had significantly better predictive performance than use of the individual scale alone did. SN - 1532-8171 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28743477/Psychological_scales_as_predictors_of_emergency_department_hospitalizations_in_suicide_attempters_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0735-6757(17)30567-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -