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Acculturation Strategies and Symptoms of Depression: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study.
J Immigr Minor Health. 2018 Aug; 20(4):792-798.JI

Abstract

Using latent class analysis, we previously identified three acculturation strategies employed by South Asian immigrants in the US. Members of the Separation class showed a preference for South Asian culture over US culture, while members of the Assimilation class showed a preference for US culture, and those in the Integration class showed a similar preference for South Asian and US cultures. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between these acculturation strategies and symptoms of depression, a common yet underdiagnosed and undertreated mental disorder. We used data from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study (n = 856). Data were collected between October 2010 and March 2013 in the San Francisco Bay Area and Chicago. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the CES-D Scale. Applying a simple new method to account for uncertainty in class assignment when modeling latent classes as an exposure, we found that respondents in the Separation class had more depressive symptoms than those in the Integration class, but only after taking into account self-reported social support (b = 0.11; p = 0.05). There were no differences in depressive symptoms among those in the Assimilation class vs. those in the Integration class (b = -0.06; p = 0.41). Social support may protect against elevated symptoms of depression in South Asian immigrants with lower levels of integration into US culture.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, 2649A SPH Tower, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2029, USA. needhamb@umich.edu.Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Department of Statistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Departments of Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Department of Health Science, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA, USA.Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28748299

Citation

Needham, Belinda L., et al. "Acculturation Strategies and Symptoms of Depression: the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study." Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, vol. 20, no. 4, 2018, pp. 792-798.
Needham BL, Mukherjee B, Bagchi P, et al. Acculturation Strategies and Symptoms of Depression: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. J Immigr Minor Health. 2018;20(4):792-798.
Needham, B. L., Mukherjee, B., Bagchi, P., Kim, C., Mukherjea, A., Kandula, N. R., & Kanaya, A. M. (2018). Acculturation Strategies and Symptoms of Depression: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 20(4), 792-798. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10903-017-0635-z
Needham BL, et al. Acculturation Strategies and Symptoms of Depression: the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. J Immigr Minor Health. 2018;20(4):792-798. PubMed PMID: 28748299.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acculturation Strategies and Symptoms of Depression: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. AU - Needham,Belinda L, AU - Mukherjee,Bhramar, AU - Bagchi,Pramita, AU - Kim,Catherine, AU - Mukherjea,Arnab, AU - Kandula,Namratha R, AU - Kanaya,Alka M, PY - 2017/7/28/pubmed PY - 2019/5/7/medline PY - 2017/7/28/entrez KW - Acculturation KW - South Asian immigrants KW - Symptoms of depression KW - United States SP - 792 EP - 798 JF - Journal of immigrant and minority health JO - J Immigr Minor Health VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - Using latent class analysis, we previously identified three acculturation strategies employed by South Asian immigrants in the US. Members of the Separation class showed a preference for South Asian culture over US culture, while members of the Assimilation class showed a preference for US culture, and those in the Integration class showed a similar preference for South Asian and US cultures. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between these acculturation strategies and symptoms of depression, a common yet underdiagnosed and undertreated mental disorder. We used data from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study (n = 856). Data were collected between October 2010 and March 2013 in the San Francisco Bay Area and Chicago. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the CES-D Scale. Applying a simple new method to account for uncertainty in class assignment when modeling latent classes as an exposure, we found that respondents in the Separation class had more depressive symptoms than those in the Integration class, but only after taking into account self-reported social support (b = 0.11; p = 0.05). There were no differences in depressive symptoms among those in the Assimilation class vs. those in the Integration class (b = -0.06; p = 0.41). Social support may protect against elevated symptoms of depression in South Asian immigrants with lower levels of integration into US culture. SN - 1557-1920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28748299/Acculturation_Strategies_and_Symptoms_of_Depression:_The_Mediators_of_Atherosclerosis_in_South_Asians_Living_in_America__MASALA__Study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10903-017-0635-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -