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Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Jul 28; 66(29):781-793.MM

Abstract

CDC has updated the interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure in response to 1) declining prevalence of Zika virus disease in the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) and 2) emerging evidence indicating prolonged detection of Zika virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Zika virus cases were first reported in the Americas during 2015-2016; however, the incidence of Zika virus disease has since declined. As the prevalence of Zika virus disease declines, the likelihood of false-positive test results increases. In addition, emerging epidemiologic and laboratory data indicate that, as is the case with other flaviviruses, Zika virus IgM antibodies can persist beyond 12 weeks after infection. Therefore, IgM test results cannot always reliably distinguish between an infection that occurred during the current pregnancy and one that occurred before the current pregnancy, particularly for women with possible Zika virus exposure before the current pregnancy. These limitations should be considered when counseling pregnant women about the risks and benefits of testing for Zika virus infection during pregnancy. This updated guidance emphasizes a shared decision-making model for testing and screening pregnant women, one in which patients and providers work together to make decisions about testing and care plans based on patient preferences and values, clinical judgment, and a balanced assessment of risks and expected outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.Zika Virus Response Team, CDC.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28749921

Citation

Oduyebo, Titilope, et al. "Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women With Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 66, no. 29, 2017, pp. 781-793.
Oduyebo T, Polen KD, Walke HT, et al. Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017;66(29):781-793.
Oduyebo, T., Polen, K. D., Walke, H. T., Reagan-Steiner, S., Lathrop, E., Rabe, I. B., Kuhnert-Tallman, W. L., Martin, S. W., Walker, A. T., Gregory, C. J., Ades, E. W., Carroll, D. S., Rivera, M., Perez-Padilla, J., Gould, C., Nemhauser, J. B., Ben Beard, C., Harcourt, J. L., Viens, L., ... Meaney-Delman, D. (2017). Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 66(29), 781-793. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6629e1
Oduyebo T, et al. Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women With Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Jul 28;66(29):781-793. PubMed PMID: 28749921.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017. AU - Oduyebo,Titilope, AU - Polen,Kara D, AU - Walke,Henry T, AU - Reagan-Steiner,Sarah, AU - Lathrop,Eva, AU - Rabe,Ingrid B, AU - Kuhnert-Tallman,Wendi L, AU - Martin,Stacey W, AU - Walker,Allison T, AU - Gregory,Christopher J, AU - Ades,Edwin W, AU - Carroll,Darin S, AU - Rivera,Maria, AU - Perez-Padilla,Janice, AU - Gould,Carolyn, AU - Nemhauser,Jeffrey B, AU - Ben Beard,C, AU - Harcourt,Jennifer L, AU - Viens,Laura, AU - Johansson,Michael, AU - Ellington,Sascha R, AU - Petersen,Emily, AU - Smith,Laura A, AU - Reichard,Jessica, AU - Munoz-Jordan,Jorge, AU - Beach,Michael J, AU - Rose,Dale A, AU - Barzilay,Ezra, AU - Noonan-Smith,Michelle, AU - Jamieson,Denise J, AU - Zaki,Sherif R, AU - Petersen,Lyle R, AU - Honein,Margaret A, AU - Meaney-Delman,Dana, Y1 - 2017/07/28/ PY - 2017/7/28/entrez PY - 2017/7/28/pubmed PY - 2017/8/2/medline SP - 781 EP - 793 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 66 IS - 29 N2 - CDC has updated the interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure in response to 1) declining prevalence of Zika virus disease in the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) and 2) emerging evidence indicating prolonged detection of Zika virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Zika virus cases were first reported in the Americas during 2015-2016; however, the incidence of Zika virus disease has since declined. As the prevalence of Zika virus disease declines, the likelihood of false-positive test results increases. In addition, emerging epidemiologic and laboratory data indicate that, as is the case with other flaviviruses, Zika virus IgM antibodies can persist beyond 12 weeks after infection. Therefore, IgM test results cannot always reliably distinguish between an infection that occurred during the current pregnancy and one that occurred before the current pregnancy, particularly for women with possible Zika virus exposure before the current pregnancy. These limitations should be considered when counseling pregnant women about the risks and benefits of testing for Zika virus infection during pregnancy. This updated guidance emphasizes a shared decision-making model for testing and screening pregnant women, one in which patients and providers work together to make decisions about testing and care plans based on patient preferences and values, clinical judgment, and a balanced assessment of risks and expected outcomes. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28749921/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6629e1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -