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Psychosocial Development in 5-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants.
Trends Hear. 2017 Jan-Dec; 21:2331216517710373.TH

Abstract

This article reports on the psychosocial development and factors influencing outcomes of 5-year-old children with cochlear implants (CIs) or hearing aids (HAs). It further examines differences between children with CIs and HAs with similar levels of hearing loss. Data were collected as part of the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment study-a prospective, population-based study. Parents/caregivers of children completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (n = 333), the Social Skills subscale from the Child Development Inventory (n = 317), and questionnaires on functional auditory behavior (Parents' Evaluation of Aural/oral performance of Children), and demographics. Children completed assessments of nonverbal cognitive ability (Wechsler Non-verbal Scale of Ability) and language (Preschool Language Scale - fourth edition). On average, parent-rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire scores on emotional or behavioral difficulties were within 1 SD of the normative mean; however, Child Development Inventory scores on social skills were more than 1 SD below the norm. Children with severe-to-profound hearing losses using HAs had significantly more behavioral problems than children with CIs. Regression analyses showed that non-verbal cognitive ability, language, and functional auditory behavior were significantly associated with psychosocial outcomes for children with HAs, whereas outcomes for children with CIs were associated with functional auditory behavior and the presence of additional disabilities. Age at hearing intervention, severity of hearing loss, and communication mode were not associated with outcomes. The results suggest that even children who develop good language ability with the help of a HA or CI may have psychosocial problems if they exhibit difficulties with listening and communicating in everyday environments. The findings have implications for developing interventions for young children with hearing loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 National Acoustics Laboratories (NAL), Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. 2 HEARing CRC, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia. 3 Macquarie University, NSW, Australia.1 National Acoustics Laboratories (NAL), Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. 2 HEARing CRC, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia.3 Macquarie University, NSW, Australia.1 National Acoustics Laboratories (NAL), Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. 2 HEARing CRC, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia.4 Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children (RIDBC), Sydney, Australia.1 National Acoustics Laboratories (NAL), Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. 2 HEARing CRC, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia.1 National Acoustics Laboratories (NAL), Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. 2 HEARing CRC, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia.1 National Acoustics Laboratories (NAL), Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. 2 HEARing CRC, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia.1 National Acoustics Laboratories (NAL), Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. 2 HEARing CRC, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28752809

Citation

Wong, Cara L., et al. "Psychosocial Development in 5-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants." Trends in Hearing, vol. 21, 2017, p. 2331216517710373.
Wong CL, Ching TYC, Cupples L, et al. Psychosocial Development in 5-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants. Trends Hear. 2017;21:2331216517710373.
Wong, C. L., Ching, T. Y. C., Cupples, L., Button, L., Leigh, G., Marnane, V., Whitfield, J., Gunnourie, M., & Martin, L. (2017). Psychosocial Development in 5-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants. Trends in Hearing, 21, 2331216517710373. https://doi.org/10.1177/2331216517710373
Wong CL, et al. Psychosocial Development in 5-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants. Trends Hear. 2017 Jan-Dec;21:2331216517710373. PubMed PMID: 28752809.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychosocial Development in 5-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants. AU - Wong,Cara L, AU - Ching,Teresa Y C, AU - Cupples,Linda, AU - Button,Laura, AU - Leigh,Greg, AU - Marnane,Vivienne, AU - Whitfield,Jessica, AU - Gunnourie,Miriam, AU - Martin,Louise, PY - 2017/7/29/entrez PY - 2017/7/29/pubmed PY - 2018/4/25/medline KW - Child Development Inventory KW - Parents’ Evaluation of Aural/oral performance of Children KW - Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire KW - cochlear implant KW - deaf or hard of hearing KW - functional communication skills KW - hearing aids KW - language KW - pediatric KW - psychosocial KW - social skills SP - 2331216517710373 EP - 2331216517710373 JF - Trends in hearing JO - Trends Hear VL - 21 N2 - This article reports on the psychosocial development and factors influencing outcomes of 5-year-old children with cochlear implants (CIs) or hearing aids (HAs). It further examines differences between children with CIs and HAs with similar levels of hearing loss. Data were collected as part of the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment study-a prospective, population-based study. Parents/caregivers of children completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (n = 333), the Social Skills subscale from the Child Development Inventory (n = 317), and questionnaires on functional auditory behavior (Parents' Evaluation of Aural/oral performance of Children), and demographics. Children completed assessments of nonverbal cognitive ability (Wechsler Non-verbal Scale of Ability) and language (Preschool Language Scale - fourth edition). On average, parent-rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire scores on emotional or behavioral difficulties were within 1 SD of the normative mean; however, Child Development Inventory scores on social skills were more than 1 SD below the norm. Children with severe-to-profound hearing losses using HAs had significantly more behavioral problems than children with CIs. Regression analyses showed that non-verbal cognitive ability, language, and functional auditory behavior were significantly associated with psychosocial outcomes for children with HAs, whereas outcomes for children with CIs were associated with functional auditory behavior and the presence of additional disabilities. Age at hearing intervention, severity of hearing loss, and communication mode were not associated with outcomes. The results suggest that even children who develop good language ability with the help of a HA or CI may have psychosocial problems if they exhibit difficulties with listening and communicating in everyday environments. The findings have implications for developing interventions for young children with hearing loss. SN - 2331-2165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28752809/Psychosocial_Development_in_5_Year_Old_Children_With_Hearing_Loss_Using_Hearing_Aids_or_Cochlear_Implants_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2331216517710373?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -