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Teen Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students: A Multilevel Analysis of School-Level Risk Factors.
J Sch Health. 2017 09; 87(9):696-704.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Much etiologic research has focused on individual-level risk factors for teen dating violence (TDV); therefore, less is known about school-level and neighborhood-level risk factors. We examined the association between alcohol outlet density around high schools and TDV victimization and the association between markers of physical disorder around schools and TDV victimization among adolescents.

METHODS

Data come from high school students participating in the Maryland Safe and Supportive Schools Initiative. Alcohol outlet density was calculated using walking distance buffers around schools. An observational tool was used to assess indicators of physical disorder on school property (eg, alcohol and drug paraphernalia). Hierarchical linear modeling was used to identify student- and school-level predictors associated with TDV victimization.

RESULTS

Overall, 11% of students reported experiencing physical TDV and 11% reported experiencing psychological TDV over the past year. Recent alcohol use was a risk factor for TDV victimization for both sexes, whereas feeling safe at school was protective against TDV victimization for both sexes. Greater alcohol outlet density was associated with decreased TDV victimization for males, however, it was nonsignificant for females. Physical disorder around schools was not associated with TDV victimization for either sex.

CONCLUSION

Although the school-level predictors were not associated with TDV victimization, alcohol use and perceptions of safety at school were significantly associated with TDV victimization. Prevention efforts to address alcohol use may affect TDV victimization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 North Broadway, RM 895, Baltimore, MD 21205. Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, 2815 Eastlake Ave East, Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98102.T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University, Tempe AZ 85287-3701.Department of Family, Community and Mental Health Systems, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, VA 22903-3388.Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21231. Wayne State University, School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 428201.Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence. Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28766318

Citation

Parker, Elizabeth M., et al. "Teen Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students: a Multilevel Analysis of School-Level Risk Factors." The Journal of School Health, vol. 87, no. 9, 2017, pp. 696-704.
Parker EM, Johnson SL, Debnam KJ, et al. Teen Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students: A Multilevel Analysis of School-Level Risk Factors. J Sch Health. 2017;87(9):696-704.
Parker, E. M., Johnson, S. L., Debnam, K. J., Milam, A. J., & Bradshaw, C. P. (2017). Teen Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students: A Multilevel Analysis of School-Level Risk Factors. The Journal of School Health, 87(9), 696-704. https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12538
Parker EM, et al. Teen Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students: a Multilevel Analysis of School-Level Risk Factors. J Sch Health. 2017;87(9):696-704. PubMed PMID: 28766318.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Teen Dating Violence Victimization Among High School Students: A Multilevel Analysis of School-Level Risk Factors. AU - Parker,Elizabeth M, AU - Johnson,Sarah Lindstrom, AU - Debnam,Katrina J, AU - Milam,Adam J, AU - Bradshaw,Catherine P, PY - 2015/02/06/received PY - 2017/01/27/revised PY - 2017/01/27/accepted PY - 2017/8/3/entrez PY - 2017/8/3/pubmed PY - 2018/5/11/medline KW - alcohol availability KW - alcohol outlet density KW - physical disorder KW - teen dating violence SP - 696 EP - 704 JF - The Journal of school health JO - J Sch Health VL - 87 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Much etiologic research has focused on individual-level risk factors for teen dating violence (TDV); therefore, less is known about school-level and neighborhood-level risk factors. We examined the association between alcohol outlet density around high schools and TDV victimization and the association between markers of physical disorder around schools and TDV victimization among adolescents. METHODS: Data come from high school students participating in the Maryland Safe and Supportive Schools Initiative. Alcohol outlet density was calculated using walking distance buffers around schools. An observational tool was used to assess indicators of physical disorder on school property (eg, alcohol and drug paraphernalia). Hierarchical linear modeling was used to identify student- and school-level predictors associated with TDV victimization. RESULTS: Overall, 11% of students reported experiencing physical TDV and 11% reported experiencing psychological TDV over the past year. Recent alcohol use was a risk factor for TDV victimization for both sexes, whereas feeling safe at school was protective against TDV victimization for both sexes. Greater alcohol outlet density was associated with decreased TDV victimization for males, however, it was nonsignificant for females. Physical disorder around schools was not associated with TDV victimization for either sex. CONCLUSION: Although the school-level predictors were not associated with TDV victimization, alcohol use and perceptions of safety at school were significantly associated with TDV victimization. Prevention efforts to address alcohol use may affect TDV victimization. SN - 1746-1561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28766318/Teen_Dating_Violence_Victimization_Among_High_School_Students:_A_Multilevel_Analysis_of_School_Level_Risk_Factors_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12538 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -