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Stimulation of diuresis and natriuresis by renomedullary infusion of a dual inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase.
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2017 Nov 01; 313(5):F1068-F1076.AJ

Abstract

The renal medulla, considered critical for the regulation of salt and water balance and long-term blood pressure control, is enriched in anandamide and two of its major metabolizing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Infusion of anandamide (15, 30, and 60 nmol·min-1·kg-1) into the renal medulla of C57BL/6J mice stimulated diuresis and salt excretion in a COX-2- but not COX-1-dependent manner. To determine whether endogenous endocannabinoids in the renal medulla can elicit similar effects, the effects of intramedullary isopropyl dodecyl fluorophosphate (IDFP), which inhibits the two major endocannabinoid hydrolases, were studied. IDFP treatment increased the urine formation rate and sodium excretion in a COX-2- but not COX-1-dependent manner. Neither anandamide nor IDFP affected the glomerular filtration rate. Neither systemic (0.625 mg·kg-1·30 min-1 iv) nor intramedullary (15 nmol·min-1·kg-1·30 min-1) IDFP pretreatment before intramedullary anandamide (15-30 nmol·min-1·kg-1) strictly blocked effects of anandamide, suggesting that hydrolysis of anandamide was not necessary for its diuretic effect. Intramedullary IDFP had no effect on renal blood flow but stimulated renal medullary blood flow. The effects of IDFP on urine flow rate and medullary blood flow were FAAH-dependent as demonstrated using FAAH knockout mice. Analysis of mouse urinary PGE2 concentrations by HPLC-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry showed that IDFP treatment decreased urinary PGE2 These data are consistent with a role of FAAH and endogenous anandamide acting through a COX-2-dependent metabolite to regulate diuresis and salt excretion in the mouse kidney.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia jkritter@vcu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28768662

Citation

Ahmad, Ashfaq, et al. "Stimulation of Diuresis and Natriuresis By Renomedullary Infusion of a Dual Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase and Monoacylglycerol Lipase." American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology, vol. 313, no. 5, 2017, pp. F1068-F1076.
Ahmad A, Daneva Z, Li G, et al. Stimulation of diuresis and natriuresis by renomedullary infusion of a dual inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2017;313(5):F1068-F1076.
Ahmad, A., Daneva, Z., Li, G., Dempsey, S. K., Li, N., Poklis, J. L., Lichtman, A., Li, P. L., & Ritter, J. K. (2017). Stimulation of diuresis and natriuresis by renomedullary infusion of a dual inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase. American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology, 313(5), F1068-F1076. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00196.2017
Ahmad A, et al. Stimulation of Diuresis and Natriuresis By Renomedullary Infusion of a Dual Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase and Monoacylglycerol Lipase. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2017 Nov 1;313(5):F1068-F1076. PubMed PMID: 28768662.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stimulation of diuresis and natriuresis by renomedullary infusion of a dual inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase. AU - Ahmad,Ashfaq, AU - Daneva,Zdravka, AU - Li,Guangbi, AU - Dempsey,Sara K, AU - Li,Ningjun, AU - Poklis,Justin L, AU - Lichtman,Aron, AU - Li,Pin-Lan, AU - Ritter,Joseph K, Y1 - 2017/08/02/ PY - 2017/04/12/received PY - 2017/07/24/revised PY - 2017/07/27/accepted PY - 2017/8/5/pubmed PY - 2017/11/10/medline PY - 2017/8/4/entrez KW - anandamide KW - diuresis KW - endogenous endocannabinoids KW - fatty acid amide hydrolase KW - renal medulla SP - F1068 EP - F1076 JF - American journal of physiology. Renal physiology JO - Am J Physiol Renal Physiol VL - 313 IS - 5 N2 - The renal medulla, considered critical for the regulation of salt and water balance and long-term blood pressure control, is enriched in anandamide and two of its major metabolizing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Infusion of anandamide (15, 30, and 60 nmol·min-1·kg-1) into the renal medulla of C57BL/6J mice stimulated diuresis and salt excretion in a COX-2- but not COX-1-dependent manner. To determine whether endogenous endocannabinoids in the renal medulla can elicit similar effects, the effects of intramedullary isopropyl dodecyl fluorophosphate (IDFP), which inhibits the two major endocannabinoid hydrolases, were studied. IDFP treatment increased the urine formation rate and sodium excretion in a COX-2- but not COX-1-dependent manner. Neither anandamide nor IDFP affected the glomerular filtration rate. Neither systemic (0.625 mg·kg-1·30 min-1 iv) nor intramedullary (15 nmol·min-1·kg-1·30 min-1) IDFP pretreatment before intramedullary anandamide (15-30 nmol·min-1·kg-1) strictly blocked effects of anandamide, suggesting that hydrolysis of anandamide was not necessary for its diuretic effect. Intramedullary IDFP had no effect on renal blood flow but stimulated renal medullary blood flow. The effects of IDFP on urine flow rate and medullary blood flow were FAAH-dependent as demonstrated using FAAH knockout mice. Analysis of mouse urinary PGE2 concentrations by HPLC-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry showed that IDFP treatment decreased urinary PGE2 These data are consistent with a role of FAAH and endogenous anandamide acting through a COX-2-dependent metabolite to regulate diuresis and salt excretion in the mouse kidney. SN - 1522-1466 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28768662/Stimulation_of_diuresis_and_natriuresis_by_renomedullary_infusion_of_a_dual_inhibitor_of_fatty_acid_amide_hydrolase_and_monoacylglycerol_lipase_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/ajprenal.00196.2017?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -