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Cytokine responses to exercise and activity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: case-control study.
Clin Exp Immunol. 2017 12; 190(3):360-371.CE

Abstract

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by fatigue after exertion. A systematic review suggested that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β concentrations are often elevated in cases of CFS when compared to healthy controls. This study attempted to replicate this finding and investigate whether post-exertional symptoms were associated with altered cytokine protein concentrations and their RNA in CFS patients. Twenty-four patients fulfilling Centers for Disease Control criteria for CFS, but with no comorbid psychiatric disorders, were recruited from two CFS clinics in London, UK. Twenty-one healthy, sedentary controls were matched by gender, age and other variables. Circulating proteins and RNA were measured for TGF-β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6 and IL-1β. We measured six further cytokine protein concentrations (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12p70, and interferon (IFN)-γ). Measures were taken at rest, and before and after both commuting and aerobic exercise. CFS cases had higher TGF-β protein levels compared to controls at rest (median (quartiles) = 43·9 (19·2, 61·8) versus 18·9 (16·1, 30·0) ng/ml) (P = 0·003), and consistently so over a 9-day period. However, this was a spurious finding due to variation between different assay batches. There were no differences between groups in changes to TGF-β protein concentrations after either commuting or exercise. All other cytokine protein and RNA levels were similar between cases and controls. Post-exertional symptoms and perceived effort were not associated with any increased cytokines. We were unable to replicate previously found elevations in circulating cytokine concentrations, suggesting that elevated circulating cytokines are not important in the pathophysiology of CFS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Psychiatry, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK.UCL Centre for Immunodeficiency, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.UCL Centre for Immunodeficiency, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.UCL Centre for Immunodeficiency, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.CIPER, Faculty of Human Kinetics, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.Genome Centre, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.Genome Centre, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.Centre for Psychiatry, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK.Centre for Psychiatry, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28779554

Citation

Clark, L V., et al. "Cytokine Responses to Exercise and Activity in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Case-control Study." Clinical and Experimental Immunology, vol. 190, no. 3, 2017, pp. 360-371.
Clark LV, Buckland M, Murphy G, et al. Cytokine responses to exercise and activity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: case-control study. Clin Exp Immunol. 2017;190(3):360-371.
Clark, L. V., Buckland, M., Murphy, G., Taylor, N., Vleck, V., Mein, C., Wozniak, E., Smuk, M., & White, P. D. (2017). Cytokine responses to exercise and activity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: case-control study. Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 190(3), 360-371. https://doi.org/10.1111/cei.13023
Clark LV, et al. Cytokine Responses to Exercise and Activity in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Case-control Study. Clin Exp Immunol. 2017;190(3):360-371. PubMed PMID: 28779554.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cytokine responses to exercise and activity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: case-control study. AU - Clark,L V, AU - Buckland,M, AU - Murphy,G, AU - Taylor,N, AU - Vleck,V, AU - Mein,C, AU - Wozniak,E, AU - Smuk,M, AU - White,P D, Y1 - 2017/10/11/ PY - 2017/07/05/accepted PY - 2017/8/6/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline PY - 2017/8/6/entrez KW - TGF-β KW - chronic fatigue syndrome KW - cytokines KW - exercise KW - myalgic encephalomyelitis SP - 360 EP - 371 JF - Clinical and experimental immunology JO - Clin Exp Immunol VL - 190 IS - 3 N2 - Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by fatigue after exertion. A systematic review suggested that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β concentrations are often elevated in cases of CFS when compared to healthy controls. This study attempted to replicate this finding and investigate whether post-exertional symptoms were associated with altered cytokine protein concentrations and their RNA in CFS patients. Twenty-four patients fulfilling Centers for Disease Control criteria for CFS, but with no comorbid psychiatric disorders, were recruited from two CFS clinics in London, UK. Twenty-one healthy, sedentary controls were matched by gender, age and other variables. Circulating proteins and RNA were measured for TGF-β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6 and IL-1β. We measured six further cytokine protein concentrations (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12p70, and interferon (IFN)-γ). Measures were taken at rest, and before and after both commuting and aerobic exercise. CFS cases had higher TGF-β protein levels compared to controls at rest (median (quartiles) = 43·9 (19·2, 61·8) versus 18·9 (16·1, 30·0) ng/ml) (P = 0·003), and consistently so over a 9-day period. However, this was a spurious finding due to variation between different assay batches. There were no differences between groups in changes to TGF-β protein concentrations after either commuting or exercise. All other cytokine protein and RNA levels were similar between cases and controls. Post-exertional symptoms and perceived effort were not associated with any increased cytokines. We were unable to replicate previously found elevations in circulating cytokine concentrations, suggesting that elevated circulating cytokines are not important in the pathophysiology of CFS. SN - 1365-2249 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28779554/Cytokine_responses_to_exercise_and_activity_in_patients_with_chronic_fatigue_syndrome:_case_control_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/cei.13023 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -