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End-of-Life Conversation Game Increases Confidence for Having End-of-Life Conversations for Chaplains-in-Training.

Abstract

CONTEXT

Discussing end-of-life issues with patients is an essential role for chaplains. Few tools are available to help chaplains-in-training develop end-of-life communication skills.

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to determine whether playing an end-of-life conversation game increases the confidence for chaplain-in-trainings to discuss end-of-life issues with patients.

METHODS

We used a convergent mixed methods design. Chaplains-in-training played the end-of-life conversation game twice over 2 weeks. For each game, pre- and postgame questionnaires measured confidence discussing end-of-life issues with patients and emotional affect. Between games, chaplains-in-training discussed end-of-life issues with an inpatient. One week after game 2, chaplains-in-training were individually interviewed. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon rank-sum t tests. Content analysis identified interview themes. Quantitative and qualitative data sets were then integrated using a joint display.

RESULTS

Twenty-three chaplains-in-training (52% female; 87% Caucasian; 70% were in year 1 of training) completed the study. Confidence scores (scale: 15-75; 75 = very confident) increased significantly after each game, increasing by 10.0 points from pregame 1 to postgame 2 ( P < .001). Positive affect subscale scores also increased significantly after each game, and shyness subscale scores decreased significantly after each game. Content analysis found that chaplains-in-training found the game to be a positive, useful experience and reported that playing twice was beneficial (not redundant).

CONCLUSION

Mixed methods analysis suggest that an end-of-life conversation game is a useful tool that can increase chaplain-in-trainings' confidence for initiating end-of-life discussions with patients. A larger sample size is needed to confirm these findings.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    1 Department of Medicine and Humanities, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.

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    2 Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA.

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    3 Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.

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    4 Department of Pediatrics and Humanities, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.

    1 Department of Medicine and Humanities, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Advance Care Planning
    Attitude to Death
    Chaplaincy Service, Hospital
    Clergy
    Female
    Games, Experimental
    Hospice Care
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Professional Role
    Qualitative Research
    Terminal Care

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28782376

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - End-of-Life Conversation Game Increases Confidence for Having End-of-Life Conversations for Chaplains-in-Training. AU - Van Scoy,Lauren Jodi, AU - Watson-Martin,Elizabeth, AU - Bohr,Tiffany A, AU - Levi,Benjamin H, AU - Green,Michael J, Y1 - 2017/08/07/ PY - 2017/8/8/pubmed PY - 2018/9/11/medline PY - 2017/8/8/entrez KW - communication KW - end-of-life conversations KW - health games KW - palliative care KW - pastoral care KW - terminal care SP - 592 EP - 600 JF - The American journal of hospice & palliative care JO - Am J Hosp Palliat Care VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - CONTEXT: Discussing end-of-life issues with patients is an essential role for chaplains. Few tools are available to help chaplains-in-training develop end-of-life communication skills. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine whether playing an end-of-life conversation game increases the confidence for chaplain-in-trainings to discuss end-of-life issues with patients. METHODS: We used a convergent mixed methods design. Chaplains-in-training played the end-of-life conversation game twice over 2 weeks. For each game, pre- and postgame questionnaires measured confidence discussing end-of-life issues with patients and emotional affect. Between games, chaplains-in-training discussed end-of-life issues with an inpatient. One week after game 2, chaplains-in-training were individually interviewed. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon rank-sum t tests. Content analysis identified interview themes. Quantitative and qualitative data sets were then integrated using a joint display. RESULTS: Twenty-three chaplains-in-training (52% female; 87% Caucasian; 70% were in year 1 of training) completed the study. Confidence scores (scale: 15-75; 75 = very confident) increased significantly after each game, increasing by 10.0 points from pregame 1 to postgame 2 ( P < .001). Positive affect subscale scores also increased significantly after each game, and shyness subscale scores decreased significantly after each game. Content analysis found that chaplains-in-training found the game to be a positive, useful experience and reported that playing twice was beneficial (not redundant). CONCLUSION: Mixed methods analysis suggest that an end-of-life conversation game is a useful tool that can increase chaplain-in-trainings' confidence for initiating end-of-life discussions with patients. A larger sample size is needed to confirm these findings. SN - 1938-2715 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28782376/End_of_Life_Conversation_Game_Increases_Confidence_for_Having_End_of_Life_Conversations_for_Chaplains_in_Training_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1049909117723619?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed ER -