Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Slow desaturation and elongation of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids as a rationale of eicosapentaenoic acid-rich diet to lower blood pressure and serum lipids in normal, hypertensive and hyperlipemic subjects.
Prostaglandins Leukot Med. 1986 Oct; 24(2-3):173-93.PL

Abstract

In normal, hypertensive and hyperlipemic subjects, diets supplemented with linoleic acid (LA) or alpha-linolenic acid (LNA) resulted in an increase of the corresponding fatty acids in serum lipids. However, their C20-derivatives, the prostaglandin precursors arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively, were not or only slightly augmented. On the other hand, an EPA-rich diet produced a marked increase of this fatty acid, especially in cholesterol esters. After this diet the decreases of blood pressure and serum lipids were more pronounced when compared with LA- and LNA-rich diets containing a 20-fold higher dose of the polyunsaturated fatty acids. The slow formation of AA and EPA from LA and LNA seems to be a characteristic finding in humans, being different from preferred laboratory animals, for instance, rats. This observation was independent of the presence of risk factors, like arterial hypertension or hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP).

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2879292

Citation

Singer, P, et al. "Slow Desaturation and Elongation of Linoleic and Alpha-linolenic Acids as a Rationale of Eicosapentaenoic Acid-rich Diet to Lower Blood Pressure and Serum Lipids in Normal, Hypertensive and Hyperlipemic Subjects." Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Medicine, vol. 24, no. 2-3, 1986, pp. 173-93.
Singer P, Berger I, Wirth M, et al. Slow desaturation and elongation of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids as a rationale of eicosapentaenoic acid-rich diet to lower blood pressure and serum lipids in normal, hypertensive and hyperlipemic subjects. Prostaglandins Leukot Med. 1986;24(2-3):173-93.
Singer, P., Berger, I., Wirth, M., Gödicke, W., Jaeger, W., & Voigt, S. (1986). Slow desaturation and elongation of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids as a rationale of eicosapentaenoic acid-rich diet to lower blood pressure and serum lipids in normal, hypertensive and hyperlipemic subjects. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Medicine, 24(2-3), 173-93.
Singer P, et al. Slow Desaturation and Elongation of Linoleic and Alpha-linolenic Acids as a Rationale of Eicosapentaenoic Acid-rich Diet to Lower Blood Pressure and Serum Lipids in Normal, Hypertensive and Hyperlipemic Subjects. Prostaglandins Leukot Med. 1986;24(2-3):173-93. PubMed PMID: 2879292.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Slow desaturation and elongation of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids as a rationale of eicosapentaenoic acid-rich diet to lower blood pressure and serum lipids in normal, hypertensive and hyperlipemic subjects. AU - Singer,P, AU - Berger,I, AU - Wirth,M, AU - Gödicke,W, AU - Jaeger,W, AU - Voigt,S, PY - 1986/10/1/pubmed PY - 1986/10/1/medline PY - 1986/10/1/entrez SP - 173 EP - 93 JF - Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and medicine JO - Prostaglandins Leukot Med VL - 24 IS - 2-3 N2 - In normal, hypertensive and hyperlipemic subjects, diets supplemented with linoleic acid (LA) or alpha-linolenic acid (LNA) resulted in an increase of the corresponding fatty acids in serum lipids. However, their C20-derivatives, the prostaglandin precursors arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively, were not or only slightly augmented. On the other hand, an EPA-rich diet produced a marked increase of this fatty acid, especially in cholesterol esters. After this diet the decreases of blood pressure and serum lipids were more pronounced when compared with LA- and LNA-rich diets containing a 20-fold higher dose of the polyunsaturated fatty acids. The slow formation of AA and EPA from LA and LNA seems to be a characteristic finding in humans, being different from preferred laboratory animals, for instance, rats. This observation was independent of the presence of risk factors, like arterial hypertension or hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP). SN - 0262-1746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2879292/Slow_desaturation_and_elongation_of_linoleic_and_alpha_linolenic_acids_as_a_rationale_of_eicosapentaenoic_acid_rich_diet_to_lower_blood_pressure_and_serum_lipids_in_normal_hypertensive_and_hyperlipemic_subjects_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dietaryfats.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -