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Associations of coffee genetic risk scores with consumption of coffee, tea and other beverages in the UK Biobank.
Addiction 2018; 113(1):148-157A

Abstract

AIMS

To evaluate the utility of coffee-related genetic variants as proxies for coffee consumption in Mendelian randomization studies, by examining their association with non-alcoholic beverage consumption (including subtypes of coffee and tea) and a range of socio-demographic and life-style factors.

DESIGN

Observational study of the association of genetic risk scores for coffee consumption with different types of non-alcoholic beverage consumption.

SETTING

UK general population.

PARTICIPANTS

Individuals of European ancestry aged 40-73 years from the UK Biobank between 2006 and 2010 (n = 114 316).

MEASUREMENTS

Genetic risk scores were constructed using two, four and eight independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of coffee consumption. Drinks were self-reported in a baseline questionnaire (all participants) and in detailed 24 dietary recall questionnaires in a subset (n = 48 692).

FINDINGS

Genetic risk scores explained up to 0.38, 0.19 and 0.76% of the variance in coffee, tea and combined coffee and tea consumption, respectively. Genetic risk scores demonstrated positive associations with both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea consumption, and with most subtypes of coffee consumption, but only with standard tea consumption. There was no clear evidence for positive associations with most other non-alcoholic beverages, but higher genetic risk for coffee consumption was associated with lower daily water consumption. The genetic risk scores were associated with increased alcohol consumption, but not consistently with other socio-demographic and life-style factors.

CONCLUSIONS

Coffee-related genetic risk scores could be used as instruments for combined coffee and tea consumption in Mendelian randomization studies. However, associations observed with alcohol consumption require further investigation to determine whether these are due to causal effects of coffee and tea consumption or biological pleiotropy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (IEU), University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (IEU), University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (IEU), University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28793181

Citation

Taylor, Amy E., et al. "Associations of Coffee Genetic Risk Scores With Consumption of Coffee, Tea and Other Beverages in the UK Biobank." Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 113, no. 1, 2018, pp. 148-157.
Taylor AE, Davey Smith G, Munafò MR. Associations of coffee genetic risk scores with consumption of coffee, tea and other beverages in the UK Biobank. Addiction. 2018;113(1):148-157.
Taylor, A. E., Davey Smith, G., & Munafò, M. R. (2018). Associations of coffee genetic risk scores with consumption of coffee, tea and other beverages in the UK Biobank. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 113(1), pp. 148-157. doi:10.1111/add.13975.
Taylor AE, Davey Smith G, Munafò MR. Associations of Coffee Genetic Risk Scores With Consumption of Coffee, Tea and Other Beverages in the UK Biobank. Addiction. 2018;113(1):148-157. PubMed PMID: 28793181.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of coffee genetic risk scores with consumption of coffee, tea and other beverages in the UK Biobank. AU - Taylor,Amy E, AU - Davey Smith,George, AU - Munafò,Marcus R, Y1 - 2017/09/29/ PY - 2016/12/22/received PY - 2017/01/27/revised PY - 2017/08/01/accepted PY - 2017/8/10/pubmed PY - 2018/8/8/medline PY - 2017/8/10/entrez KW - Caffeine KW - Mendelian randomization KW - coffee KW - drinks KW - genetics KW - tea SP - 148 EP - 157 JF - Addiction (Abingdon, England) JO - Addiction VL - 113 IS - 1 N2 - AIMS: To evaluate the utility of coffee-related genetic variants as proxies for coffee consumption in Mendelian randomization studies, by examining their association with non-alcoholic beverage consumption (including subtypes of coffee and tea) and a range of socio-demographic and life-style factors. DESIGN: Observational study of the association of genetic risk scores for coffee consumption with different types of non-alcoholic beverage consumption. SETTING: UK general population. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals of European ancestry aged 40-73 years from the UK Biobank between 2006 and 2010 (n = 114 316). MEASUREMENTS: Genetic risk scores were constructed using two, four and eight independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of coffee consumption. Drinks were self-reported in a baseline questionnaire (all participants) and in detailed 24 dietary recall questionnaires in a subset (n = 48 692). FINDINGS: Genetic risk scores explained up to 0.38, 0.19 and 0.76% of the variance in coffee, tea and combined coffee and tea consumption, respectively. Genetic risk scores demonstrated positive associations with both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea consumption, and with most subtypes of coffee consumption, but only with standard tea consumption. There was no clear evidence for positive associations with most other non-alcoholic beverages, but higher genetic risk for coffee consumption was associated with lower daily water consumption. The genetic risk scores were associated with increased alcohol consumption, but not consistently with other socio-demographic and life-style factors. CONCLUSIONS: Coffee-related genetic risk scores could be used as instruments for combined coffee and tea consumption in Mendelian randomization studies. However, associations observed with alcohol consumption require further investigation to determine whether these are due to causal effects of coffee and tea consumption or biological pleiotropy. SN - 1360-0443 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28793181/Associations_of_coffee_genetic_risk_scores_with_consumption_of_coffee_tea_and_other_beverages_in_the_UK_Biobank_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/add.13975 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -