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Uncovering Capgras delusion using a large-scale medical records database.
BJPsych Open 2017; 3(4):179-185BO

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Capgras delusion is scientifically important but most commonly reported as single case studies. Studies analysing large clinical records databases focus on common disorders but none have investigated rare syndromes.

AIMS

Identify cases of Capgras delusion and associated psychopathology, demographics, cognitive function and neuropathology in light of existing models.

METHOD

Combined computational data extraction and qualitative classification using 250 000 case records from South London and Maudsley Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) database.

RESULTS

We identified 84 individuals and extracted diagnosis-matched comparison groups. Capgras was not 'monothematic' in the majority of cases. Most cases involved misidentified family members or close partners but others were misidentified in 25% of cases, contrary to dual-route face recognition models. Neuroimaging provided no evidence for predominantly right hemisphere damage. Individuals were ethnically diverse with a range of psychosis spectrum diagnoses.

CONCLUSIONS

Capgras is more diverse than current models assume. Identification of rare syndromes complements existing 'big data' approaches in psychiatry.

DECLARATION OF INTERESTS

V.B. is supported by a Wellcome Trust Seed Award in Science (200589/Z/16/Z) and the UCLH NIHR Biomedical Research Centre. S.W. is supported by a Wellcome Trust Strategic Award (WT098455MA). Q.D. has received a grant from King's Health Partners.

Authors+Show Affiliations

, PhD DClinPsy, Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK; South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK., MBBS MRCPsych, Lewisham Mental Health Learning Disabilities Team, Behavioural & Developmental, Psychiatry Clinical Academic Group, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK., MSc, Psychological Interventions Clinic for Outpatients with Psychosis, Maudsley Psychology Centre, Maudsley Hospital, London, UK., PhD, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK., PhD DSc, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK., PhD, MRCPsych, Cultural and Social Neuroscience Research Group, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28794897

Citation

Bell, Vaughan, et al. "Uncovering Capgras Delusion Using a Large-scale Medical Records Database." BJPsych Open, vol. 3, no. 4, 2017, pp. 179-185.
Bell V, Marshall C, Kanji Z, et al. Uncovering Capgras delusion using a large-scale medical records database. BJPsych Open. 2017;3(4):179-185.
Bell, V., Marshall, C., Kanji, Z., Wilkinson, S., Halligan, P., & Deeley, Q. (2017). Uncovering Capgras delusion using a large-scale medical records database. BJPsych Open, 3(4), pp. 179-185. doi:10.1192/bjpo.bp.117.005041.
Bell V, et al. Uncovering Capgras Delusion Using a Large-scale Medical Records Database. BJPsych Open. 2017;3(4):179-185. PubMed PMID: 28794897.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Uncovering Capgras delusion using a large-scale medical records database. AU - Bell,Vaughan, AU - Marshall,Caryl, AU - Kanji,Zara, AU - Wilkinson,Sam, AU - Halligan,Peter, AU - Deeley,Quinton, Y1 - 2017/08/03/ PY - 2017/05/03/received PY - 2017/06/26/revised PY - 2017/06/27/accepted PY - 2017/8/11/entrez PY - 2017/8/11/pubmed PY - 2017/8/11/medline SP - 179 EP - 185 JF - BJPsych open JO - BJPsych Open VL - 3 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Capgras delusion is scientifically important but most commonly reported as single case studies. Studies analysing large clinical records databases focus on common disorders but none have investigated rare syndromes. AIMS: Identify cases of Capgras delusion and associated psychopathology, demographics, cognitive function and neuropathology in light of existing models. METHOD: Combined computational data extraction and qualitative classification using 250 000 case records from South London and Maudsley Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) database. RESULTS: We identified 84 individuals and extracted diagnosis-matched comparison groups. Capgras was not 'monothematic' in the majority of cases. Most cases involved misidentified family members or close partners but others were misidentified in 25% of cases, contrary to dual-route face recognition models. Neuroimaging provided no evidence for predominantly right hemisphere damage. Individuals were ethnically diverse with a range of psychosis spectrum diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: Capgras is more diverse than current models assume. Identification of rare syndromes complements existing 'big data' approaches in psychiatry. DECLARATION OF INTERESTS: V.B. is supported by a Wellcome Trust Seed Award in Science (200589/Z/16/Z) and the UCLH NIHR Biomedical Research Centre. S.W. is supported by a Wellcome Trust Strategic Award (WT098455MA). Q.D. has received a grant from King's Health Partners. COPYRIGHT AND USAGE: © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. SN - 2056-4724 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28794897/Uncovering_Capgras_delusion_using_a_large_scale_medical_records_database_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S2056472400002222/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -