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The economic implications of sylvatic rabies eradication in Italy.
Zoonoses Public Health. 2018 02; 65(1):147-157.ZP

Abstract

After more than 10 years of absence, sylvatic rabies re-appeared in Italy in 2008. To prevent disease spread, three oral rabies vaccination (ORV) campaigns targeting red foxes were performed through manual distribution of vaccine baits between January and September 2009. As these campaigns proved unsuccessful, at the end of December 2009, baits started being distributed using helicopters, allowing uniform coverage of larger areas in a shorter time period. From winter 2009 to autumn 2016, a total of 15 ORV campaigns (four emergency, four regular and seven preventive ORV) were implemented through aerial distribution of baits. In this study, we assessed the costs of the aerial ORV campaigns, which were aimed at eradicating the disease and reobtaining the rabies-free status. Cumulative costs per km2 were estimated at €59.45 during emergency campaigns and ranged between €51.94 and €65.67 in the regular vaccinations. The main portion of costs for ORV programmes were related to baits supply and distribution: €49.24 (82.83%) in emergency campaigns and from €40.33 to € 43.35 in regular ORVs (71.97% and 66.02%, respectively). At the end of each ORV campaign, the efficacy of vaccination activities was estimated by assessing the proportion of foxes testing positive for tetracycline biomarker in jawbone, indicating bait intake. Results revealed that the proportion of foxes that ingested baits varied between 70.97% and 95.51%. Statistical analysis indicated that reducing the density of dropped baits could potentially lead to a cost-saving of 22.81%, still maintaining a satisfactory level of bait intake by the fox population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (IZSVe), Legnaro (PD), Italy.Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (IZSVe), Legnaro (PD), Italy.TeSAF Department, University of Padova, Legnaro (PD), Italy.Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (IZSVe), Legnaro (PD), Italy.Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (IZSVe), Legnaro (PD), Italy.Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (IZSVe), Legnaro (PD), Italy.Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (IZSVe), Legnaro (PD), Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28795513

Citation

Sartore, S, et al. "The Economic Implications of Sylvatic Rabies Eradication in Italy." Zoonoses and Public Health, vol. 65, no. 1, 2018, pp. 147-157.
Sartore S, Mulatti P, Trestini S, et al. The economic implications of sylvatic rabies eradication in Italy. Zoonoses Public Health. 2018;65(1):147-157.
Sartore, S., Mulatti, P., Trestini, S., Lorenzetto, M., Gagliazzo, L., Marangon, S., & Bonfanti, L. (2018). The economic implications of sylvatic rabies eradication in Italy. Zoonoses and Public Health, 65(1), 147-157. https://doi.org/10.1111/zph.12383
Sartore S, et al. The Economic Implications of Sylvatic Rabies Eradication in Italy. Zoonoses Public Health. 2018;65(1):147-157. PubMed PMID: 28795513.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The economic implications of sylvatic rabies eradication in Italy. AU - Sartore,S, AU - Mulatti,P, AU - Trestini,S, AU - Lorenzetto,M, AU - Gagliazzo,L, AU - Marangon,S, AU - Bonfanti,L, Y1 - 2017/08/09/ PY - 2017/04/04/received PY - 2017/8/11/pubmed PY - 2018/8/9/medline PY - 2017/8/11/entrez KW - Italy KW - cost assessment KW - economics KW - oral rabies vaccination KW - red fox KW - sylvatic rabies SP - 147 EP - 157 JF - Zoonoses and public health JO - Zoonoses Public Health VL - 65 IS - 1 N2 - After more than 10 years of absence, sylvatic rabies re-appeared in Italy in 2008. To prevent disease spread, three oral rabies vaccination (ORV) campaigns targeting red foxes were performed through manual distribution of vaccine baits between January and September 2009. As these campaigns proved unsuccessful, at the end of December 2009, baits started being distributed using helicopters, allowing uniform coverage of larger areas in a shorter time period. From winter 2009 to autumn 2016, a total of 15 ORV campaigns (four emergency, four regular and seven preventive ORV) were implemented through aerial distribution of baits. In this study, we assessed the costs of the aerial ORV campaigns, which were aimed at eradicating the disease and reobtaining the rabies-free status. Cumulative costs per km2 were estimated at €59.45 during emergency campaigns and ranged between €51.94 and €65.67 in the regular vaccinations. The main portion of costs for ORV programmes were related to baits supply and distribution: €49.24 (82.83%) in emergency campaigns and from €40.33 to € 43.35 in regular ORVs (71.97% and 66.02%, respectively). At the end of each ORV campaign, the efficacy of vaccination activities was estimated by assessing the proportion of foxes testing positive for tetracycline biomarker in jawbone, indicating bait intake. Results revealed that the proportion of foxes that ingested baits varied between 70.97% and 95.51%. Statistical analysis indicated that reducing the density of dropped baits could potentially lead to a cost-saving of 22.81%, still maintaining a satisfactory level of bait intake by the fox population. SN - 1863-2378 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28795513/The_economic_implications_of_sylvatic_rabies_eradication_in_Italy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/zph.12383 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -