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Self-reported vision impairment and incident prefrailty and frailty in English community-dwelling older adults: findings from a 4-year follow-up study.
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 Nov; 71(11):1053-1058.JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little is known about vision impairment and frailty in older age. We investigated the relationship of poor vision and incident prefrailty and frailty.

METHODS

Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses with 4-year follow-up of 2836 English community-dwellers aged ≥60 years. Vision impairment was defined as poor self-reported vision. A score of 0 out of the 5 Fried phenotype components was defined as non-frail, 1-2 prefrail and ≥3 as frail. Participants non-frail at baseline were followed-up for incident prefrailty and frailty. Participants prefrail at baseline were followed-up for incident frailty.

RESULTS

49% of participants (n=1396) were non-frail, 42% (n=1178) prefrail and 9% (n=262) frail. At follow-up, there were 367 new cases of prefrailty and frailty among those non-frail at baseline, and 133 new cases of frailty among those prefrail at baseline. In cross-sectional analysis, vision impairment was associated with frailty (age-adjustedandsex-adjusted OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.95 to 3.30). The association remained after further adjustment for wealth, education, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, falls, cognition and depression. In longitudinal analysis, compared with non-frail participants with no vision impairment, non-frail participants with vision impairment had twofold increased risks of prefrailty or frailty at follow-up (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.24). The association remained after further adjustment. Prefrail participants with vision impairment did not have greater risks of becoming frail at follow-up.

CONCLUSION

Non-frail older adults who experience poor vision have increased risks of becoming prefrail and frail over 4 years. This is of public health importance as both vision impairment and frailty affect a large number of older adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK.Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK.Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28798152

Citation

Liljas, Ann E M., et al. "Self-reported Vision Impairment and Incident Prefrailty and Frailty in English Community-dwelling Older Adults: Findings From a 4-year Follow-up Study." Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, vol. 71, no. 11, 2017, pp. 1053-1058.
Liljas AEM, Carvalho LA, Papachristou E, et al. Self-reported vision impairment and incident prefrailty and frailty in English community-dwelling older adults: findings from a 4-year follow-up study. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017;71(11):1053-1058.
Liljas, A. E. M., Carvalho, L. A., Papachristou, E., De Oliveira, C., Wannamethee, S. G., Ramsay, S. E., & Walters, K. R. (2017). Self-reported vision impairment and incident prefrailty and frailty in English community-dwelling older adults: findings from a 4-year follow-up study. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 71(11), 1053-1058. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2017-209207
Liljas AEM, et al. Self-reported Vision Impairment and Incident Prefrailty and Frailty in English Community-dwelling Older Adults: Findings From a 4-year Follow-up Study. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017;71(11):1053-1058. PubMed PMID: 28798152.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported vision impairment and incident prefrailty and frailty in English community-dwelling older adults: findings from a 4-year follow-up study. AU - Liljas,Ann E M, AU - Carvalho,Livia A, AU - Papachristou,Efstathios, AU - De Oliveira,Cesar, AU - Wannamethee,S Goya, AU - Ramsay,Sheena E, AU - Walters,Kate R, Y1 - 2017/08/10/ PY - 2017/03/16/received PY - 2017/06/13/revised PY - 2017/07/06/accepted PY - 2017/8/12/pubmed PY - 2018/6/21/medline PY - 2017/8/12/entrez KW - ageing KW - frailty KW - older adults KW - pre-frailty KW - vision impairment SP - 1053 EP - 1058 JF - Journal of epidemiology and community health JO - J Epidemiol Community Health VL - 71 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little is known about vision impairment and frailty in older age. We investigated the relationship of poor vision and incident prefrailty and frailty. METHODS: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses with 4-year follow-up of 2836 English community-dwellers aged ≥60 years. Vision impairment was defined as poor self-reported vision. A score of 0 out of the 5 Fried phenotype components was defined as non-frail, 1-2 prefrail and ≥3 as frail. Participants non-frail at baseline were followed-up for incident prefrailty and frailty. Participants prefrail at baseline were followed-up for incident frailty. RESULTS: 49% of participants (n=1396) were non-frail, 42% (n=1178) prefrail and 9% (n=262) frail. At follow-up, there were 367 new cases of prefrailty and frailty among those non-frail at baseline, and 133 new cases of frailty among those prefrail at baseline. In cross-sectional analysis, vision impairment was associated with frailty (age-adjustedandsex-adjusted OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.95 to 3.30). The association remained after further adjustment for wealth, education, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, falls, cognition and depression. In longitudinal analysis, compared with non-frail participants with no vision impairment, non-frail participants with vision impairment had twofold increased risks of prefrailty or frailty at follow-up (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.24). The association remained after further adjustment. Prefrail participants with vision impairment did not have greater risks of becoming frail at follow-up. CONCLUSION: Non-frail older adults who experience poor vision have increased risks of becoming prefrail and frail over 4 years. This is of public health importance as both vision impairment and frailty affect a large number of older adults. SN - 1470-2738 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28798152/Self_reported_vision_impairment_and_incident_prefrailty_and_frailty_in_English_community_dwelling_older_adults:_findings_from_a_4_year_follow_up_study_ L2 - http://jech.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=28798152 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -