Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dissociating maternal responses to sad and happy facial expressions of their own child: An fMRI study.
PLoS One. 2017; 12(8):e0182476.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Maternal sensitive behavior depends on recognizing one's own child's affective states. The present study investigated distinct and overlapping neural responses of mothers to sad and happy facial expressions of their own child (in comparison to facial expressions of an unfamiliar child).

METHODS

We used functional MRI to measure dissociable and overlapping activation patterns in 27 healthy mothers in response to happy, neutral and sad facial expressions of their own school-aged child and a gender- and age-matched unfamiliar child. To investigate differential activation to sad compared to happy faces of one's own child, we used interaction contrasts. During the scan, mothers had to indicate the affect of the presented face. After scanning, they were asked to rate the perceived emotional arousal and valence levels for each face using a 7-point Likert-scale (adapted SAM version).

RESULTS

While viewing their own child's sad faces, mothers showed activation in the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex whereas happy facial expressions of the own child elicited activation in the hippocampus. Conjoint activation in response to one's own child happy and sad expressions was found in the insula and the superior temporal gyrus.

CONCLUSIONS

Maternal brain activations differed depending on the child's affective state. Sad faces of the own child activated areas commonly associated with a threat detection network, whereas happy faces activated reward related brain areas. Overlapping activation was found in empathy related networks. These distinct neural activation patterns might facilitate sensitive maternal behavior.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Mitte, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Mitte, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Mitte, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Mitte, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Virchow, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Virchow, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.Department for General Psychiatry, Center of Psychosocial Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.Section for Disorders of Personality Development, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Centre of Psychosocial Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Virchow, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité Campus Mitte, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28806742

Citation

Kluczniok, Dorothea, et al. "Dissociating Maternal Responses to Sad and Happy Facial Expressions of Their Own Child: an fMRI Study." PloS One, vol. 12, no. 8, 2017, pp. e0182476.
Kluczniok D, Hindi Attar C, Stein J, et al. Dissociating maternal responses to sad and happy facial expressions of their own child: An fMRI study. PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0182476.
Kluczniok, D., Hindi Attar, C., Stein, J., Poppinga, S., Fydrich, T., Jaite, C., Kappel, V., Brunner, R., Herpertz, S. C., Boedeker, K., & Bermpohl, F. (2017). Dissociating maternal responses to sad and happy facial expressions of their own child: An fMRI study. PloS One, 12(8), e0182476. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0182476
Kluczniok D, et al. Dissociating Maternal Responses to Sad and Happy Facial Expressions of Their Own Child: an fMRI Study. PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0182476. PubMed PMID: 28806742.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dissociating maternal responses to sad and happy facial expressions of their own child: An fMRI study. AU - Kluczniok,Dorothea, AU - Hindi Attar,Catherine, AU - Stein,Jenny, AU - Poppinga,Sina, AU - Fydrich,Thomas, AU - Jaite,Charlotte, AU - Kappel,Viola, AU - Brunner,Romuald, AU - Herpertz,Sabine C, AU - Boedeker,Katja, AU - Bermpohl,Felix, Y1 - 2017/08/14/ PY - 2016/07/25/received PY - 2017/07/19/accepted PY - 2017/8/15/entrez PY - 2017/8/15/pubmed PY - 2017/10/11/medline SP - e0182476 EP - e0182476 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 12 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Maternal sensitive behavior depends on recognizing one's own child's affective states. The present study investigated distinct and overlapping neural responses of mothers to sad and happy facial expressions of their own child (in comparison to facial expressions of an unfamiliar child). METHODS: We used functional MRI to measure dissociable and overlapping activation patterns in 27 healthy mothers in response to happy, neutral and sad facial expressions of their own school-aged child and a gender- and age-matched unfamiliar child. To investigate differential activation to sad compared to happy faces of one's own child, we used interaction contrasts. During the scan, mothers had to indicate the affect of the presented face. After scanning, they were asked to rate the perceived emotional arousal and valence levels for each face using a 7-point Likert-scale (adapted SAM version). RESULTS: While viewing their own child's sad faces, mothers showed activation in the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex whereas happy facial expressions of the own child elicited activation in the hippocampus. Conjoint activation in response to one's own child happy and sad expressions was found in the insula and the superior temporal gyrus. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal brain activations differed depending on the child's affective state. Sad faces of the own child activated areas commonly associated with a threat detection network, whereas happy faces activated reward related brain areas. Overlapping activation was found in empathy related networks. These distinct neural activation patterns might facilitate sensitive maternal behavior. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28806742/Dissociating_maternal_responses_to_sad_and_happy_facial_expressions_of_their_own_child:_An_fMRI_study_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0182476 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -