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The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and frequency of sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption among low-income adults in the US.
Nutr Health. 2017 Sep; 23(3):147-157.NH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was designed to help low-income people purchase nutritious foods in the US. In recent years, there has been a consistent call for banning purchases of sugar drinks in SNAP.

AIM

The aim of this study was to examine the association between SNAP participation and the frequency of sugar-sweetened soft drink (SSD) consumption among low-income adults in the US.

METHOD

Data came from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Low-income adults aged ≥20 years with a household income ≤250% of the Federal Poverty Level (N = 1200) were categorized into two groups based on the household's SNAP receipt: SNAP recipients (n = 393) and non-recipients (n = 807). Propensity-score matching was used to minimize observable differences between these two groups that may explain the difference in SSD consumption, generating the final sample of 393 matched pairs (SNAP recipients, n = 393; non-recipients, n = 393). An ordinal logistic regression was conducted on the matched sample.

RESULTS

SNAP recipients were more likely to report higher levels of SSD consumption, compared with non-recipients (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.17-2.07). Male gender (AOR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.17-2.46), younger age (AOR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96-0.99), lower education level (AOR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.33-3.89), and soda availability in homes (AOR = 2.24, 95% CI = 1.77-2.83) were also associated with higher levels of SSD consumption among low-income adults.

CONCLUSIONS

SNAP participation was associated with frequent SSD consumption. To reduce SSD consumption, strategic efforts need to focus on educating people about the harms of SSD and promoting nutritious food choices with SNAP benefits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.2 Department of Applied Health Science, School of Public Health, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA.3 School of Education, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28820019

Citation

Park, Jiyeun, et al. "The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Frequency of Sugar-sweetened Soft Drink Consumption Among Low-income Adults in the US." Nutrition and Health, vol. 23, no. 3, 2017, pp. 147-157.
Park J, Lin HC, Peng CY. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and frequency of sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption among low-income adults in the US. Nutr Health. 2017;23(3):147-157.
Park, J., Lin, H. C., & Peng, C. Y. (2017). The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and frequency of sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption among low-income adults in the US. Nutrition and Health, 23(3), 147-157. https://doi.org/10.1177/0260106017726248
Park J, Lin HC, Peng CY. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Frequency of Sugar-sweetened Soft Drink Consumption Among Low-income Adults in the US. Nutr Health. 2017;23(3):147-157. PubMed PMID: 28820019.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and frequency of sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption among low-income adults in the US. AU - Park,Jiyeun, AU - Lin,Hsien-Chang, AU - Peng,Chao-Ying, Y1 - 2017/08/18/ PY - 2017/8/19/pubmed PY - 2019/1/3/medline PY - 2017/8/19/entrez KW - Sugar-sweetened soft drink KW - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program KW - low-income KW - nutrition KW - policy SP - 147 EP - 157 JF - Nutrition and health JO - Nutr Health VL - 23 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was designed to help low-income people purchase nutritious foods in the US. In recent years, there has been a consistent call for banning purchases of sugar drinks in SNAP. AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the association between SNAP participation and the frequency of sugar-sweetened soft drink (SSD) consumption among low-income adults in the US. METHOD: Data came from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Low-income adults aged ≥20 years with a household income ≤250% of the Federal Poverty Level (N = 1200) were categorized into two groups based on the household's SNAP receipt: SNAP recipients (n = 393) and non-recipients (n = 807). Propensity-score matching was used to minimize observable differences between these two groups that may explain the difference in SSD consumption, generating the final sample of 393 matched pairs (SNAP recipients, n = 393; non-recipients, n = 393). An ordinal logistic regression was conducted on the matched sample. RESULTS: SNAP recipients were more likely to report higher levels of SSD consumption, compared with non-recipients (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.17-2.07). Male gender (AOR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.17-2.46), younger age (AOR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96-0.99), lower education level (AOR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.33-3.89), and soda availability in homes (AOR = 2.24, 95% CI = 1.77-2.83) were also associated with higher levels of SSD consumption among low-income adults. CONCLUSIONS: SNAP participation was associated with frequent SSD consumption. To reduce SSD consumption, strategic efforts need to focus on educating people about the harms of SSD and promoting nutritious food choices with SNAP benefits. SN - 0260-1060 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28820019/The_Supplemental_Nutrition_Assistance_Program_and_frequency_of_sugar_sweetened_soft_drink_consumption_among_low_income_adults_in_the_US_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0260106017726248?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -