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Relationship Among Koenig Depression Scale and Postoperative Outcomes, Ambulation, and Perception of Pain in Elderly Patients (≥65 Years) Undergoing Elective Spinal Surgery for Adult Scoliosis.
World Neurosurg. 2017 Nov; 107:471-476.WN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The aim of this study was to assess whether the Koenig Depression Scale (KDS) can identify depressed elderly patients undergoing elective spine surgery for deformity at risk for inferior postoperative outcomes including complication rates, ambulation ability, and patient-reported outcomes.

METHODS

The medical records of 92 elderly patients (≥65 years) undergoing a planned elective spinal surgery for correction of adult degenerative scoliosis were reviewed for this study. Preoperative baseline depression was assessed using the validated KDS that was administered by a board-certified geriatrician. KDS is made up of 11 questions with a maximum of 11 points (No-Depression = KDS <4, Depression = KDS ≥4). The primary outcomes of this study were complication rates, duration of hospital stay, ambulation ability, and follow-up visual analog scale (VAS) scores at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after hospital discharge.

RESULTS

Of the 92 patients, 20 of them (21.7%) were found to have a KDS ≥4. Baseline demographics and comorbidities were similar between both cohorts. Intraoperative variables and complications were similar between both cohorts. There were no significant differences in postoperative complications including length of hospital stay. There was no significant difference in ambulation abilities including preoperative gait speed (P = 0.38), days from operation to ambulation (P = 0.86), steps on first day of ambulation (P = 0.57), and steps before hospital discharge (P = 0.35). There was no significant difference between the cohorts in VAS scores at baseline (P = 0.19), 6 weeks (P = 0.91), 3 months (P = 0.58), and 6 months (P = 0.97) after hospital discharge.

CONCLUSIONS

Our study found no difference in complication rates, ambulation abilities, and follow-up VAS scores between patients with and without depression using preoperative KDS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Electronic address: owoicho.adogwa@gmail.com.Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28826716

Citation

Adogwa, Owoicho, et al. "Relationship Among Koenig Depression Scale and Postoperative Outcomes, Ambulation, and Perception of Pain in Elderly Patients (≥65 Years) Undergoing Elective Spinal Surgery for Adult Scoliosis." World Neurosurgery, vol. 107, 2017, pp. 471-476.
Adogwa O, Elsamadicy AA, Sergesketter AR, et al. Relationship Among Koenig Depression Scale and Postoperative Outcomes, Ambulation, and Perception of Pain in Elderly Patients (≥65 Years) Undergoing Elective Spinal Surgery for Adult Scoliosis. World Neurosurg. 2017;107:471-476.
Adogwa, O., Elsamadicy, A. A., Sergesketter, A. R., Black, C., Tarnasky, A., Ongele, M. O., Vuong, V. D., Khalid, S., Cheng, J., Bagley, C. A., & Karikari, I. O. (2017). Relationship Among Koenig Depression Scale and Postoperative Outcomes, Ambulation, and Perception of Pain in Elderly Patients (≥65 Years) Undergoing Elective Spinal Surgery for Adult Scoliosis. World Neurosurgery, 107, 471-476. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2017.07.165
Adogwa O, et al. Relationship Among Koenig Depression Scale and Postoperative Outcomes, Ambulation, and Perception of Pain in Elderly Patients (≥65 Years) Undergoing Elective Spinal Surgery for Adult Scoliosis. World Neurosurg. 2017;107:471-476. PubMed PMID: 28826716.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship Among Koenig Depression Scale and Postoperative Outcomes, Ambulation, and Perception of Pain in Elderly Patients (≥65 Years) Undergoing Elective Spinal Surgery for Adult Scoliosis. AU - Adogwa,Owoicho, AU - Elsamadicy,Aladine A, AU - Sergesketter,Amanda R, AU - Black,Collin, AU - Tarnasky,Aaron, AU - Ongele,Michael O, AU - Vuong,Victoria D, AU - Khalid,Syed, AU - Cheng,Joseph, AU - Bagley,Carlos A, AU - Karikari,Isaac O, Y1 - 2017/08/05/ PY - 2017/06/02/received PY - 2017/07/25/revised PY - 2017/07/27/accepted PY - 2017/8/23/pubmed PY - 2017/12/27/medline PY - 2017/8/23/entrez KW - Ambulation KW - Geriatric KW - Koenig Depression Scale KW - Scoliosis KW - Spine surgery SP - 471 EP - 476 JF - World neurosurgery JO - World Neurosurg VL - 107 N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess whether the Koenig Depression Scale (KDS) can identify depressed elderly patients undergoing elective spine surgery for deformity at risk for inferior postoperative outcomes including complication rates, ambulation ability, and patient-reported outcomes. METHODS: The medical records of 92 elderly patients (≥65 years) undergoing a planned elective spinal surgery for correction of adult degenerative scoliosis were reviewed for this study. Preoperative baseline depression was assessed using the validated KDS that was administered by a board-certified geriatrician. KDS is made up of 11 questions with a maximum of 11 points (No-Depression = KDS <4, Depression = KDS ≥4). The primary outcomes of this study were complication rates, duration of hospital stay, ambulation ability, and follow-up visual analog scale (VAS) scores at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after hospital discharge. RESULTS: Of the 92 patients, 20 of them (21.7%) were found to have a KDS ≥4. Baseline demographics and comorbidities were similar between both cohorts. Intraoperative variables and complications were similar between both cohorts. There were no significant differences in postoperative complications including length of hospital stay. There was no significant difference in ambulation abilities including preoperative gait speed (P = 0.38), days from operation to ambulation (P = 0.86), steps on first day of ambulation (P = 0.57), and steps before hospital discharge (P = 0.35). There was no significant difference between the cohorts in VAS scores at baseline (P = 0.19), 6 weeks (P = 0.91), 3 months (P = 0.58), and 6 months (P = 0.97) after hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS: Our study found no difference in complication rates, ambulation abilities, and follow-up VAS scores between patients with and without depression using preoperative KDS. SN - 1878-8769 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28826716/Relationship_Among_Koenig_Depression_Scale_and_Postoperative_Outcomes_Ambulation_and_Perception_of_Pain_in_Elderly_Patients__≥65_Years__Undergoing_Elective_Spinal_Surgery_for_Adult_Scoliosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1878-8750(17)31265-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -