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Differential Vector Competency of Aedes albopictus Populations from the Americas for Zika Virus.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017 Aug; 97(2):330-339.AJ

Abstract

To evaluate the potential role of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) as a vector of Zika virus (ZIKV), colonized mosquitoes of low generation number (≤ F5) from Brazil, Houston, and the Rio Grande Valley of Texas engorged on viremic mice infected with ZIKV strains originating from Senegal, Cambodia, Mexico, Brazil, or Puerto Rico. Vector competence was established by monitoring infection, dissemination, and transmission potential after 3, 7, and 14 days of extrinsic incubation. Positive saliva samples were assayed for infectious titer. Although all three mosquito populations were susceptible to all ZIKV strains, rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission differed among mosquito and virus strains. Aedes albopictus from Salvador, Brazil, were the least efficient vectors, demonstrating susceptibility to infection to two American strains of ZIKV but failing to shed virus in saliva. Mosquitoes from the Rio Grande Valley were the most efficient vectors and were capable of shedding all three tested ZIKV strains into saliva after 14 days of extrinsic incubation. In particular, ZIKV strain DakAR 41525 (Senegal 1954) was significantly more efficient at dissemination and saliva deposition than the others tested in Rio Grande mosquitoes. Overall, our data indicate that, while Ae. albopictus is capable of transmitting ZIKV, its competence is potentially dependent on geographic origin of both the mosquito population and the viral strain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Department of Pathology, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Department of Pathology, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Department of Pathology, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Department of Pathology, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Department of Pathology, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Department of Pathology, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Centro Regional de Salud Pública, Tapachula, Chiapas, México.University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, Texas.Instituto de Saúde Coletiva, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Ministério da Saúde, Candeal, Salvador, Brazil.Mosquito and Vector Control Division, Harris County Public Health, Houston, Texas.Mosquito and Vector Control Division, Harris County Public Health, Houston, Texas.Mosquito and Vector Control Division, Harris County Public Health, Houston, Texas.Mosquito and Vector Control Division, Harris County Public Health, Houston, Texas.Population Biology, Ecology, and Evolution Graduate Program, Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Department of Environmental Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.Instituto de Saúde Coletiva, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Ministério da Saúde, Candeal, Salvador, Brazil.Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico.Department of Pathology, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Department of Pathology, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28829735

Citation

Azar, Sasha R., et al. "Differential Vector Competency of Aedes Albopictus Populations From the Americas for Zika Virus." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 97, no. 2, 2017, pp. 330-339.
Azar SR, Roundy CM, Rossi SL, et al. Differential Vector Competency of Aedes albopictus Populations from the Americas for Zika Virus. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017;97(2):330-339.
Azar, S. R., Roundy, C. M., Rossi, S. L., Huang, J. H., Leal, G., Yun, R., Fernandez-Salas, I., Vitek, C. J., Paploski, I. A. D., Stark, P. M., Vela, J., Debboun, M., Reyna, M., Kitron, U., Ribeiro, G. S., Hanley, K. A., Vasilakis, N., & Weaver, S. C. (2017). Differential Vector Competency of Aedes albopictus Populations from the Americas for Zika Virus. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 97(2), 330-339. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.16-0969
Azar SR, et al. Differential Vector Competency of Aedes Albopictus Populations From the Americas for Zika Virus. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017;97(2):330-339. PubMed PMID: 28829735.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differential Vector Competency of Aedes albopictus Populations from the Americas for Zika Virus. AU - Azar,Sasha R, AU - Roundy,Christopher M, AU - Rossi,Shannan L, AU - Huang,Jing H, AU - Leal,Grace, AU - Yun,Ruimei, AU - Fernandez-Salas,Ildefonso, AU - Vitek,Christopher J, AU - Paploski,Igor A D, AU - Stark,Pamela M, AU - Vela,Jeremy, AU - Debboun,Mustapha, AU - Reyna,Martin, AU - Kitron,Uriel, AU - Ribeiro,Guilherme S, AU - Hanley,Kathryn A, AU - Vasilakis,Nikos, AU - Weaver,Scott C, PY - 2017/8/23/entrez PY - 2017/8/23/pubmed PY - 2017/9/12/medline SP - 330 EP - 339 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 97 IS - 2 N2 - To evaluate the potential role of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) as a vector of Zika virus (ZIKV), colonized mosquitoes of low generation number (≤ F5) from Brazil, Houston, and the Rio Grande Valley of Texas engorged on viremic mice infected with ZIKV strains originating from Senegal, Cambodia, Mexico, Brazil, or Puerto Rico. Vector competence was established by monitoring infection, dissemination, and transmission potential after 3, 7, and 14 days of extrinsic incubation. Positive saliva samples were assayed for infectious titer. Although all three mosquito populations were susceptible to all ZIKV strains, rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission differed among mosquito and virus strains. Aedes albopictus from Salvador, Brazil, were the least efficient vectors, demonstrating susceptibility to infection to two American strains of ZIKV but failing to shed virus in saliva. Mosquitoes from the Rio Grande Valley were the most efficient vectors and were capable of shedding all three tested ZIKV strains into saliva after 14 days of extrinsic incubation. In particular, ZIKV strain DakAR 41525 (Senegal 1954) was significantly more efficient at dissemination and saliva deposition than the others tested in Rio Grande mosquitoes. Overall, our data indicate that, while Ae. albopictus is capable of transmitting ZIKV, its competence is potentially dependent on geographic origin of both the mosquito population and the viral strain. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28829735/Differential_Vector_Competency_of_Aedes_albopictus_Populations_from_the_Americas_for_Zika_Virus_ L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.16-0969?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -