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Rhizobacterial community structure differences among sorghum cultivars in different growth stages and soils.
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2017 08 01; 93(8)FM

Abstract

Plant genotype selects the rhizosphere microbiome. The success of plant-microbe interactions is dependent on factors that directly or indirectly influence the plant rhizosphere microbial composition. We investigated the rhizosphere bacterial community composition of seven different sorghum cultivars in two different soil types (abandoned (CF) and agricultural (VD)). The rhizosphere bacterial community was evaluated at four different plant growth stages: emergence of the second (day 10) and third leaves (day 20), the transition between the vegetative and reproductive stages (day 35), and the emergence of the last visible leaf (day 50). At early stages (days 10 and 20), the sorghum rhizosphere bacterial community composition was mainly driven by soil type, whereas at late stages (days 35 and 50), the bacterial community composition was also affected by the sorghum genotype. Although this effect of sorghum genotype was small, different sorghum cultivars assembled significantly different bacterial community compositions. In CF soil, the striga-resistant cultivar had significantly higher relative abundances of Acidobacteria GP1, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus (Burkholderiaceae), Acidovorax and Albidiferax (Comamonadaceae) than the other six cultivars. This study is the first to simultaneously investigate the contributions of plant genotype, plant growth stage and soil type in shaping sorghum rhizosphere bacterial community composition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Department of Microbial Ecology, 6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands. Department of Biology, Leiden University, 2333 BE Leiden, The Netherlands.Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Department of Microbial Ecology, 6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands. Department of Biology, Leiden University, 2333 BE Leiden, The Netherlands. Department of Agroecology, Maranhão State University, 65055-970 São Luis, Brazil.Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Department of Microbial Ecology, 6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands.Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, 6700 HB Wageningen, The Netherlands.Plant Hormone Biology Group, Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, University of Amsterdam (UVA), 1098 XH Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Department of Microbial Ecology, 6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands. Department of Biology, Leiden University, 2333 BE Leiden, The Netherlands.Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Department of Microbial Ecology, 6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28830071

Citation

Schlemper, Thiago R., et al. "Rhizobacterial Community Structure Differences Among Sorghum Cultivars in Different Growth Stages and Soils." FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 93, no. 8, 2017.
Schlemper TR, Leite MFA, Lucheta AR, et al. Rhizobacterial community structure differences among sorghum cultivars in different growth stages and soils. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2017;93(8).
Schlemper, T. R., Leite, M. F. A., Lucheta, A. R., Shimels, M., Bouwmeester, H. J., van Veen, J. A., & Kuramae, E. E. (2017). Rhizobacterial community structure differences among sorghum cultivars in different growth stages and soils. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 93(8). https://doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fix096
Schlemper TR, et al. Rhizobacterial Community Structure Differences Among Sorghum Cultivars in Different Growth Stages and Soils. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2017 08 1;93(8) PubMed PMID: 28830071.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rhizobacterial community structure differences among sorghum cultivars in different growth stages and soils. AU - Schlemper,Thiago R, AU - Leite,Márcio F A, AU - Lucheta,Adriano R, AU - Shimels,Mahdere, AU - Bouwmeester,Harro J, AU - van Veen,Johannes A, AU - Kuramae,Eiko E, PY - 2017/04/20/received PY - 2017/07/20/accepted PY - 2017/8/24/entrez PY - 2017/8/24/pubmed PY - 2017/12/27/medline KW - 16S rRNA KW - Sorghum genotypes; rhizosphere KW - bacterial community composition KW - next-generation sequencing KW - strigolactone JF - FEMS microbiology ecology JO - FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. VL - 93 IS - 8 N2 - Plant genotype selects the rhizosphere microbiome. The success of plant-microbe interactions is dependent on factors that directly or indirectly influence the plant rhizosphere microbial composition. We investigated the rhizosphere bacterial community composition of seven different sorghum cultivars in two different soil types (abandoned (CF) and agricultural (VD)). The rhizosphere bacterial community was evaluated at four different plant growth stages: emergence of the second (day 10) and third leaves (day 20), the transition between the vegetative and reproductive stages (day 35), and the emergence of the last visible leaf (day 50). At early stages (days 10 and 20), the sorghum rhizosphere bacterial community composition was mainly driven by soil type, whereas at late stages (days 35 and 50), the bacterial community composition was also affected by the sorghum genotype. Although this effect of sorghum genotype was small, different sorghum cultivars assembled significantly different bacterial community compositions. In CF soil, the striga-resistant cultivar had significantly higher relative abundances of Acidobacteria GP1, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus (Burkholderiaceae), Acidovorax and Albidiferax (Comamonadaceae) than the other six cultivars. This study is the first to simultaneously investigate the contributions of plant genotype, plant growth stage and soil type in shaping sorghum rhizosphere bacterial community composition. SN - 1574-6941 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28830071/Rhizobacterial_community_structure_differences_among_sorghum_cultivars_in_different_growth_stages_and_soils_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/femsec/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/femsec/fix096 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -