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Population characteristics associated with pharmacy-based influenza vaccination in United States survey data.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2017 Nov - Dec; 57(6):654-660.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the population characteristics associated with the health behavior of receiving an influenza vaccine from a pharmacy-based setting.

DESIGN

Secondary analysis of data from states that participated in an optional influenza module in the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a state-based observational survey of U.S. adults.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

Analytic sample of 28,954 respondents from 8 states and Puerto Rico who reported receiving an influenza vaccination in the past year.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The main outcome was a self-reported categoric variable indicating the setting of the most recent seasonal influenza vaccination: doctor's office, pharmacy-based store, or other setting.

RESULTS

Multinomial logistic regression results showed that environmental, predisposing, enabling, and need factors in the Andersen model were salient features associated with odds of using pharmacy-based influenza vaccination settings instead of a doctor's office. Residents of states that allowed pharmacists as immunizers before 1999 reported greater use of pharmacy-based store settings (odds ratio [OR] 1.31). Compared with young adults, individuals 65 years of age and older were more likely to choose a pharmacy-based store than a doctor's office (OR 1.41) and less likely to use other community settings (OR 0.45). Compared with non-Hispanic whites, black respondents were less likely to use pharmacy-based store vaccination (OR 0.51), and multiracial and Hispanic respondents were more likely to use other settings (ORs 1.47 and 1.60, respectively). Enabling and need factors were also associated with setting.

CONCLUSION

Based on this dataset of selected states from 2014, almost one-fourth of U.S. adults who reported receiving an annual influenza vaccination did so from a pharmacy-based store; 35% reported using other community-based settings that may enlist pharmacists as immunizers. There were striking disparities in use of nontraditional vaccination settings by age and race or ethnicity. Pharmacists and pharmacies should address missed opportunities for vaccination by targeting outreach efforts based on environmental and predisposing characteristics.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28830660

Citation

Inguva, Sushmitha, et al. "Population Characteristics Associated With Pharmacy-based Influenza Vaccination in United States Survey Data." Journal of the American Pharmacists Association : JAPhA, vol. 57, no. 6, 2017, pp. 654-660.
Inguva S, Sautter JM, Chun GJ, et al. Population characteristics associated with pharmacy-based influenza vaccination in United States survey data. J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2017;57(6):654-660.
Inguva, S., Sautter, J. M., Chun, G. J., Patterson, B. J., & McGhan, W. F. (2017). Population characteristics associated with pharmacy-based influenza vaccination in United States survey data. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association : JAPhA, 57(6), 654-660. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.japh.2017.07.007
Inguva S, et al. Population Characteristics Associated With Pharmacy-based Influenza Vaccination in United States Survey Data. J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2017 Nov - Dec;57(6):654-660. PubMed PMID: 28830660.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Population characteristics associated with pharmacy-based influenza vaccination in United States survey data. AU - Inguva,Sushmitha, AU - Sautter,Jessica M, AU - Chun,Grace J, AU - Patterson,Brandon J, AU - McGhan,William F, Y1 - 2017/08/19/ PY - 2017/03/01/received PY - 2017/07/18/revised PY - 2017/07/20/accepted PY - 2017/8/24/pubmed PY - 2018/6/26/medline PY - 2017/8/24/entrez SP - 654 EP - 660 JF - Journal of the American Pharmacists Association : JAPhA JO - J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) VL - 57 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the population characteristics associated with the health behavior of receiving an influenza vaccine from a pharmacy-based setting. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of data from states that participated in an optional influenza module in the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a state-based observational survey of U.S. adults. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Analytic sample of 28,954 respondents from 8 states and Puerto Rico who reported receiving an influenza vaccination in the past year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main outcome was a self-reported categoric variable indicating the setting of the most recent seasonal influenza vaccination: doctor's office, pharmacy-based store, or other setting. RESULTS: Multinomial logistic regression results showed that environmental, predisposing, enabling, and need factors in the Andersen model were salient features associated with odds of using pharmacy-based influenza vaccination settings instead of a doctor's office. Residents of states that allowed pharmacists as immunizers before 1999 reported greater use of pharmacy-based store settings (odds ratio [OR] 1.31). Compared with young adults, individuals 65 years of age and older were more likely to choose a pharmacy-based store than a doctor's office (OR 1.41) and less likely to use other community settings (OR 0.45). Compared with non-Hispanic whites, black respondents were less likely to use pharmacy-based store vaccination (OR 0.51), and multiracial and Hispanic respondents were more likely to use other settings (ORs 1.47 and 1.60, respectively). Enabling and need factors were also associated with setting. CONCLUSION: Based on this dataset of selected states from 2014, almost one-fourth of U.S. adults who reported receiving an annual influenza vaccination did so from a pharmacy-based store; 35% reported using other community-based settings that may enlist pharmacists as immunizers. There were striking disparities in use of nontraditional vaccination settings by age and race or ethnicity. Pharmacists and pharmacies should address missed opportunities for vaccination by targeting outreach efforts based on environmental and predisposing characteristics. SN - 1544-3450 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28830660/Population_characteristics_associated_with_pharmacy_based_influenza_vaccination_in_United_States_survey_data_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1544-3191(17)30789-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -