Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Microbial community composition and electricity generation in cattle manure slurry treatment using microbial fuel cells: effects of inoculum addition.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Oct; 24(29):23226-23235.ES

Abstract

Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a sustainable technology to treat cattle manure slurry (CMS) for converting chemical energy to bioelectricity. In this work, two types of allochthonous inoculum including activated sludge (AS) and domestic sewage (DS) were added into the MFC systems to enhance anode biofilm formation and electricity generation. Results indicated that MFCs (AS + CMS) obtained the maximum electricity output with voltage approaching 577 ± 7 mV (~ 196 h), followed by MFCs (DS + CMS) (520 ± 21 mV, ~ 236 h) and then MFCs with autochthonous inoculum (429 ± 62 mV, ~ 263.5 h). Though the raw cattle manure slurry (RCMS) could facilitate electricity production in MFCs, the addition of allochthonous inoculum (AS/DS) significantly reduced the startup time and enhanced the output voltage. Moreover, the maximum power (1.259 ± 0.015 W/m2) and the highest COD removal (84.72 ± 0.48%) were obtained in MFCs (AS + CMS). With regard to microbial community, Illumina HiSeq of the 16S rRNA gene was employed in this work and the exoelectrogens (Geobacter and Shewanella) were identified as the dominant members on all anode biofilms in MFCs. For anode microbial diversity, the MFCs (AS + CMS) outperformed MFCs (DS + CMS) and MFCs (RCMS), allowing the occurrence of the fermentative (e.g., Bacteroides) and nitrogen fixation bacteria (e.g., Azoarcus and Sterolibacterium) which enabled the efficient degradation of the slurry. This study provided a feasible strategy to analyze the anode biofilm formation by adding allochthonous inoculum and some implications for quick startup of MFC reactors for CMS treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin, 150090, China.School of Engineering, Northeast Agriculture University, 59 Mucai Street, Xiangfang District, Harbin, 150030, China. gongweijia@126.com.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin, 150090, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin, 150090, China. hitliangheng@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28831702

Citation

Xie, Binghan, et al. "Microbial Community Composition and Electricity Generation in Cattle Manure Slurry Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cells: Effects of Inoculum Addition." Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, vol. 24, no. 29, 2017, pp. 23226-23235.
Xie B, Gong W, Ding A, et al. Microbial community composition and electricity generation in cattle manure slurry treatment using microbial fuel cells: effects of inoculum addition. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017;24(29):23226-23235.
Xie, B., Gong, W., Ding, A., Yu, H., Qu, F., Tang, X., Yan, Z., Li, G., & Liang, H. (2017). Microbial community composition and electricity generation in cattle manure slurry treatment using microbial fuel cells: effects of inoculum addition. Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 24(29), 23226-23235. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-9959-4
Xie B, et al. Microbial Community Composition and Electricity Generation in Cattle Manure Slurry Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cells: Effects of Inoculum Addition. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017;24(29):23226-23235. PubMed PMID: 28831702.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbial community composition and electricity generation in cattle manure slurry treatment using microbial fuel cells: effects of inoculum addition. AU - Xie,Binghan, AU - Gong,Weijia, AU - Ding,An, AU - Yu,Huarong, AU - Qu,Fangshu, AU - Tang,Xiaobin, AU - Yan,Zhongsen, AU - Li,Guibai, AU - Liang,Heng, Y1 - 2017/08/22/ PY - 2017/04/04/received PY - 2017/08/11/accepted PY - 2017/8/24/pubmed PY - 2018/10/3/medline PY - 2017/8/24/entrez KW - Cattle manure slurry (CMS) KW - Inoculum KW - Microbial community structure KW - Microbial fuel cell (MFC) KW - Startup time SP - 23226 EP - 23235 JF - Environmental science and pollution research international JO - Environ Sci Pollut Res Int VL - 24 IS - 29 N2 - Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a sustainable technology to treat cattle manure slurry (CMS) for converting chemical energy to bioelectricity. In this work, two types of allochthonous inoculum including activated sludge (AS) and domestic sewage (DS) were added into the MFC systems to enhance anode biofilm formation and electricity generation. Results indicated that MFCs (AS + CMS) obtained the maximum electricity output with voltage approaching 577 ± 7 mV (~ 196 h), followed by MFCs (DS + CMS) (520 ± 21 mV, ~ 236 h) and then MFCs with autochthonous inoculum (429 ± 62 mV, ~ 263.5 h). Though the raw cattle manure slurry (RCMS) could facilitate electricity production in MFCs, the addition of allochthonous inoculum (AS/DS) significantly reduced the startup time and enhanced the output voltage. Moreover, the maximum power (1.259 ± 0.015 W/m2) and the highest COD removal (84.72 ± 0.48%) were obtained in MFCs (AS + CMS). With regard to microbial community, Illumina HiSeq of the 16S rRNA gene was employed in this work and the exoelectrogens (Geobacter and Shewanella) were identified as the dominant members on all anode biofilms in MFCs. For anode microbial diversity, the MFCs (AS + CMS) outperformed MFCs (DS + CMS) and MFCs (RCMS), allowing the occurrence of the fermentative (e.g., Bacteroides) and nitrogen fixation bacteria (e.g., Azoarcus and Sterolibacterium) which enabled the efficient degradation of the slurry. This study provided a feasible strategy to analyze the anode biofilm formation by adding allochthonous inoculum and some implications for quick startup of MFC reactors for CMS treatment. SN - 1614-7499 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28831702/Microbial_community_composition_and_electricity_generation_in_cattle_manure_slurry_treatment_using_microbial_fuel_cells:_effects_of_inoculum_addition_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-9959-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -