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Effect of dietary alpha-linolenate/linoleate balance on brain lipid compositions and learning ability of rats.
J Lipid Res. 1987 Feb; 28(2):144-51.JL

Abstract

Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive control, Wistar/Kyoto (WKY) rats through two generations were fed a semipurified diet supplemented either with safflower oil (rich in linoleate) or with perilla oil (rich in alpha-linolenate). The cerebral lipid contents and phospholipid compositions did not differ between the two dietary groups of SHR rats. There were also no differences in the unsaturated/saturated ratios of individual phospholipids or the proportions of plasma-logens. However, the proportions of (n-3) and (n-6) fatty acids were significantly different. Decreases in the proportions of docosahexaenoate [22:6 (n-3)] in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine in the safflower oil group were compensated for with increases in the proportions of docosatetraenoic [22:4 (n-6)] and docosapentaenoic [22:5 (n-6)] acids as compared with the perilla oil group. These differences in phospholipid acyl chains were much smaller than the difference in the proportions of linoleate and alpha-linolenate of the diets. In a brightness-discrimination learning test, the total number of responses to the positive and negative stimuli were less in the groups fed perilla oil. However, the alpha-linolenate-deficient group took longer to decrease the frequency of R- responses and therefore longer to learn the discrimination. Consequently, the correct response ratios were higher in the perilla oil groups than in the safflower oil groups. Thus, the dietary alpha-linolenate/linoleate balance influenced the (n-3)/(n-6) balance of polyenoic fatty acids differently among brain phospholipids.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2883248

Citation

Yamamoto, N, et al. "Effect of Dietary Alpha-linolenate/linoleate Balance On Brain Lipid Compositions and Learning Ability of Rats." Journal of Lipid Research, vol. 28, no. 2, 1987, pp. 144-51.
Yamamoto N, Saitoh M, Moriuchi A, et al. Effect of dietary alpha-linolenate/linoleate balance on brain lipid compositions and learning ability of rats. J Lipid Res. 1987;28(2):144-51.
Yamamoto, N., Saitoh, M., Moriuchi, A., Nomura, M., & Okuyama, H. (1987). Effect of dietary alpha-linolenate/linoleate balance on brain lipid compositions and learning ability of rats. Journal of Lipid Research, 28(2), 144-51.
Yamamoto N, et al. Effect of Dietary Alpha-linolenate/linoleate Balance On Brain Lipid Compositions and Learning Ability of Rats. J Lipid Res. 1987;28(2):144-51. PubMed PMID: 2883248.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of dietary alpha-linolenate/linoleate balance on brain lipid compositions and learning ability of rats. AU - Yamamoto,N, AU - Saitoh,M, AU - Moriuchi,A, AU - Nomura,M, AU - Okuyama,H, PY - 1987/2/1/pubmed PY - 1987/2/1/medline PY - 1987/2/1/entrez SP - 144 EP - 51 JF - Journal of lipid research JO - J Lipid Res VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive control, Wistar/Kyoto (WKY) rats through two generations were fed a semipurified diet supplemented either with safflower oil (rich in linoleate) or with perilla oil (rich in alpha-linolenate). The cerebral lipid contents and phospholipid compositions did not differ between the two dietary groups of SHR rats. There were also no differences in the unsaturated/saturated ratios of individual phospholipids or the proportions of plasma-logens. However, the proportions of (n-3) and (n-6) fatty acids were significantly different. Decreases in the proportions of docosahexaenoate [22:6 (n-3)] in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine in the safflower oil group were compensated for with increases in the proportions of docosatetraenoic [22:4 (n-6)] and docosapentaenoic [22:5 (n-6)] acids as compared with the perilla oil group. These differences in phospholipid acyl chains were much smaller than the difference in the proportions of linoleate and alpha-linolenate of the diets. In a brightness-discrimination learning test, the total number of responses to the positive and negative stimuli were less in the groups fed perilla oil. However, the alpha-linolenate-deficient group took longer to decrease the frequency of R- responses and therefore longer to learn the discrimination. Consequently, the correct response ratios were higher in the perilla oil groups than in the safflower oil groups. Thus, the dietary alpha-linolenate/linoleate balance influenced the (n-3)/(n-6) balance of polyenoic fatty acids differently among brain phospholipids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0022-2275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2883248/Effect_of_dietary_alpha_linolenate/linoleate_balance_on_brain_lipid_compositions_and_learning_ability_of_rats_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-2275(20)38713-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -