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Wearable Microfluidic Diaphragm Pressure Sensor for Health and Tactile Touch Monitoring.
Adv Mater 2017; 29(39)AM

Abstract

Flexible pressure sensors have many potential applications in wearable electronics, robotics, health monitoring, and more. In particular, liquid-metal-based sensors are especially promising as they can undergo strains of over 200% without failure. However, current liquid-metal-based strain sensors are incapable of resolving small pressure changes in the few kPa range, making them unsuitable for applications such as heart-rate monitoring, which require a much lower pressure detection resolution. In this paper, a microfluidic tactile diaphragm pressure sensor based on embedded Galinstan microchannels (70 µm width × 70 µm height) capable of resolving sub-50 Pa changes in pressure with sub-100 Pa detection limits and a response time of 90 ms is demonstrated. An embedded equivalent Wheatstone bridge circuit makes the most of tangential and radial strain fields, leading to high sensitivities of a 0.0835 kPa-1 change in output voltage. The Wheatstone bridge also provides temperature self-compensation, allowing for operation in the range of 20-50 °C. As examples of potential applications, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wristband with an embedded microfluidic diaphragm pressure sensor capable of real-time pulse monitoring and a PDMS glove with multiple embedded sensors to provide comprehensive tactile feedback of a human hand when touching or holding objects are demonstrated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072, China.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072, China. Key Laboratory of Mechanism Theory and Equipment Design of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072, China.National Center for Computer Animation, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, BH12 5BB, UK.School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072, China.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28833673

Citation

Gao, Yuji, et al. "Wearable Microfluidic Diaphragm Pressure Sensor for Health and Tactile Touch Monitoring." Advanced Materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.), vol. 29, no. 39, 2017.
Gao Y, Ota H, Schaler EW, et al. Wearable Microfluidic Diaphragm Pressure Sensor for Health and Tactile Touch Monitoring. Adv Mater Weinheim. 2017;29(39).
Gao, Y., Ota, H., Schaler, E. W., Chen, K., Zhao, A., Gao, W., ... Javey, A. (2017). Wearable Microfluidic Diaphragm Pressure Sensor for Health and Tactile Touch Monitoring. Advanced Materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.), 29(39), doi:10.1002/adma.201701985.
Gao Y, et al. Wearable Microfluidic Diaphragm Pressure Sensor for Health and Tactile Touch Monitoring. Adv Mater Weinheim. 2017;29(39) PubMed PMID: 28833673.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Wearable Microfluidic Diaphragm Pressure Sensor for Health and Tactile Touch Monitoring. AU - Gao,Yuji, AU - Ota,Hiroki, AU - Schaler,Ethan W, AU - Chen,Kevin, AU - Zhao,Allan, AU - Gao,Wei, AU - Fahad,Hossain M, AU - Leng,Yonggang, AU - Zheng,Anzong, AU - Xiong,Furui, AU - Zhang,Chuchu, AU - Tai,Li-Chia, AU - Zhao,Peida, AU - Fearing,Ronald S, AU - Javey,Ali, Y1 - 2017/08/18/ PY - 2017/04/09/received PY - 2017/06/23/revised PY - 2017/8/24/pubmed PY - 2019/1/23/medline PY - 2017/8/24/entrez KW - diaphragm pressure sensors KW - flexible pressure sensors KW - liquid metal KW - microfluidics KW - wearable JF - Advanced materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.) JO - Adv. Mater. Weinheim VL - 29 IS - 39 N2 - Flexible pressure sensors have many potential applications in wearable electronics, robotics, health monitoring, and more. In particular, liquid-metal-based sensors are especially promising as they can undergo strains of over 200% without failure. However, current liquid-metal-based strain sensors are incapable of resolving small pressure changes in the few kPa range, making them unsuitable for applications such as heart-rate monitoring, which require a much lower pressure detection resolution. In this paper, a microfluidic tactile diaphragm pressure sensor based on embedded Galinstan microchannels (70 µm width × 70 µm height) capable of resolving sub-50 Pa changes in pressure with sub-100 Pa detection limits and a response time of 90 ms is demonstrated. An embedded equivalent Wheatstone bridge circuit makes the most of tangential and radial strain fields, leading to high sensitivities of a 0.0835 kPa-1 change in output voltage. The Wheatstone bridge also provides temperature self-compensation, allowing for operation in the range of 20-50 °C. As examples of potential applications, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wristband with an embedded microfluidic diaphragm pressure sensor capable of real-time pulse monitoring and a PDMS glove with multiple embedded sensors to provide comprehensive tactile feedback of a human hand when touching or holding objects are demonstrated. SN - 1521-4095 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28833673/Wearable_Microfluidic_Diaphragm_Pressure_Sensor_for_Health_and_Tactile_Touch_Monitoring_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201701985 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -