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A Vote for School Lunches: School Lunches Provide Superior Nutrient Quality than Lunches Obtained from Other Sources in a Nationally Representative Sample of US Children.
Nutrients. 2017 Aug 24; 9(9)N

Abstract

Childhood obesity is an ongoing public health program. As such, a major public health research objective is to identify potential targets for intervention; one such area is school lunches (SL). The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) serves over 31 million children each day; the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is uniquely positioned to allow researchers to assess diet quality in federal nutrition assistance programs. The objective of the study was to investigate whether lunches provided by schools provide different nutritional value than lunches obtained elsewhere. In a nationally representative sample of 2190 children, consumption of a school-provided lunch (SL) was associated with greater nutritional quality compared to lunches obtained elsewhere across both age and income categories. Children who were eligible for no-cost school lunch, but did not participate in the NSLP consumed approximately 60% more energy, 58% more total fat, 60% more saturated fat, 50% more solid fat, 61% more sodium, double the amount of added sugars and less than half the amount of fruit than NSLP participants (all p < 0.001). The results of this study suggest that though widely criticized, school lunches provide superior nutrient quality than lunches obtained from other sources, particularly for low-income children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06468, USA. jvernarelli@fairfield.edu.Department of Biology, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06468, USA. bobrien@naviencesystems.com.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28837090

Citation

Vernarelli, Jacqueline A., and Brady O'Brien. "A Vote for School Lunches: School Lunches Provide Superior Nutrient Quality Than Lunches Obtained From Other Sources in a Nationally Representative Sample of US Children." Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 9, 2017.
Vernarelli JA, O'Brien B. A Vote for School Lunches: School Lunches Provide Superior Nutrient Quality than Lunches Obtained from Other Sources in a Nationally Representative Sample of US Children. Nutrients. 2017;9(9).
Vernarelli, J. A., & O'Brien, B. (2017). A Vote for School Lunches: School Lunches Provide Superior Nutrient Quality than Lunches Obtained from Other Sources in a Nationally Representative Sample of US Children. Nutrients, 9(9). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9090924
Vernarelli JA, O'Brien B. A Vote for School Lunches: School Lunches Provide Superior Nutrient Quality Than Lunches Obtained From Other Sources in a Nationally Representative Sample of US Children. Nutrients. 2017 Aug 24;9(9) PubMed PMID: 28837090.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Vote for School Lunches: School Lunches Provide Superior Nutrient Quality than Lunches Obtained from Other Sources in a Nationally Representative Sample of US Children. AU - Vernarelli,Jacqueline A, AU - O'Brien,Brady, Y1 - 2017/08/24/ PY - 2017/07/18/received PY - 2017/08/10/revised PY - 2017/08/14/accepted PY - 2017/8/25/entrez PY - 2017/8/25/pubmed PY - 2018/6/9/medline KW - NHANES KW - diet quality KW - energy density KW - obesity KW - school lunch JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 9 IS - 9 N2 - Childhood obesity is an ongoing public health program. As such, a major public health research objective is to identify potential targets for intervention; one such area is school lunches (SL). The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) serves over 31 million children each day; the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is uniquely positioned to allow researchers to assess diet quality in federal nutrition assistance programs. The objective of the study was to investigate whether lunches provided by schools provide different nutritional value than lunches obtained elsewhere. In a nationally representative sample of 2190 children, consumption of a school-provided lunch (SL) was associated with greater nutritional quality compared to lunches obtained elsewhere across both age and income categories. Children who were eligible for no-cost school lunch, but did not participate in the NSLP consumed approximately 60% more energy, 58% more total fat, 60% more saturated fat, 50% more solid fat, 61% more sodium, double the amount of added sugars and less than half the amount of fruit than NSLP participants (all p < 0.001). The results of this study suggest that though widely criticized, school lunches provide superior nutrient quality than lunches obtained from other sources, particularly for low-income children. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28837090/A_Vote_for_School_Lunches:_School_Lunches_Provide_Superior_Nutrient_Quality_than_Lunches_Obtained_from_Other_Sources_in_a_Nationally_Representative_Sample_of_US_Children_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu9090924 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -