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Long-term housing subsidies and SSI/SSDI income: Creating health-promoting contexts for families experiencing housing instability with disabilities.
Disabil Health J. 2018 04; 11(2):214-220.DH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Though disability and housing instability are discussed separately in public health literature, few studies address families at their intersection. As a result, little is known about families who experience both homelessness and disability, how many receive disability benefits like SSI and SSDI, or the influence of those benefits on health-promoting outcomes like housing stability and self-sufficiency. Moreover, no previous research compares the ability of different housing and service interventions to increase disability benefit access.

OBJECTIVE

We examine relationships between disabilities and SSI/SSDI income reported when families enter emergency shelters and later health-promoting outcomes (housing stability and self-sufficiency) and how housing interventions affect SSI/SSDI receipt.

METHODS

Families in the (name removed) Study (N = 1857) were interviewed in emergency shelters, randomly offered of one of three housing interventions or usual care (i.e., no immediate referral to any intervention beyond shelter), and re-interviewed 20 months later.

RESULTS

A third of families reported a disability at shelter entry. SSI/SSDI coverage of these families increased nearly 10% points over 20 months but never exceeded 40%. Disabilities predicted greater housing instability, food insecurity, and economic stress and less work and income. Among families reporting disabilities, SSI/SSDI receipt predicted fewer returns to emergency shelter, and more income despite less work. Offers of long-term housing subsidies increased SSI/SSDI receipt.

CONCLUSIONS

Many families experiencing homelessness have disabilities; those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits have better housing and income outcomes. Providing families experiencing homelessness with long-term housing subsidies and SSI/SSDI could improve public health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Vanderbilt University, 130 Magnolia Circle, Nashville, TN, 37203, United States. Electronic address: zachary.s.glendening@vanderbilt.edu.Cornell University, Martha Van Rensselaer Hall, #170, Ithaca, NY, 14850, United States. Electronic address: ejm354@cornell.edu.Vanderbilt University, 130 Magnolia Circle, Nashville, TN, 37203, United States. Electronic address: beth.shinn@vanderbilt.edu.Vanderbilt University, 130 Magnolia Circle, Nashville, TN, 37203, United States. Electronic address: scott.r.brown@vanderbilt.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28851508

Citation

Glendening, Zachary S., et al. "Long-term Housing Subsidies and SSI/SSDI Income: Creating Health-promoting Contexts for Families Experiencing Housing Instability With Disabilities." Disability and Health Journal, vol. 11, no. 2, 2018, pp. 214-220.
Glendening ZS, McCauley E, Shinn M, et al. Long-term housing subsidies and SSI/SSDI income: Creating health-promoting contexts for families experiencing housing instability with disabilities. Disabil Health J. 2018;11(2):214-220.
Glendening, Z. S., McCauley, E., Shinn, M., & Brown, S. R. (2018). Long-term housing subsidies and SSI/SSDI income: Creating health-promoting contexts for families experiencing housing instability with disabilities. Disability and Health Journal, 11(2), 214-220. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dhjo.2017.08.006
Glendening ZS, et al. Long-term Housing Subsidies and SSI/SSDI Income: Creating Health-promoting Contexts for Families Experiencing Housing Instability With Disabilities. Disabil Health J. 2018;11(2):214-220. PubMed PMID: 28851508.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term housing subsidies and SSI/SSDI income: Creating health-promoting contexts for families experiencing housing instability with disabilities. AU - Glendening,Zachary S, AU - McCauley,Erin, AU - Shinn,Marybeth, AU - Brown,Scott R, Y1 - 2017/08/26/ PY - 2017/05/11/received PY - 2017/07/25/revised PY - 2017/08/17/accepted PY - 2017/8/31/pubmed PY - 2018/10/16/medline PY - 2017/8/31/entrez KW - Disability KW - Homeless families KW - Housing subsidies SP - 214 EP - 220 JF - Disability and health journal JO - Disabil Health J VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Though disability and housing instability are discussed separately in public health literature, few studies address families at their intersection. As a result, little is known about families who experience both homelessness and disability, how many receive disability benefits like SSI and SSDI, or the influence of those benefits on health-promoting outcomes like housing stability and self-sufficiency. Moreover, no previous research compares the ability of different housing and service interventions to increase disability benefit access. OBJECTIVE: We examine relationships between disabilities and SSI/SSDI income reported when families enter emergency shelters and later health-promoting outcomes (housing stability and self-sufficiency) and how housing interventions affect SSI/SSDI receipt. METHODS: Families in the (name removed) Study (N = 1857) were interviewed in emergency shelters, randomly offered of one of three housing interventions or usual care (i.e., no immediate referral to any intervention beyond shelter), and re-interviewed 20 months later. RESULTS: A third of families reported a disability at shelter entry. SSI/SSDI coverage of these families increased nearly 10% points over 20 months but never exceeded 40%. Disabilities predicted greater housing instability, food insecurity, and economic stress and less work and income. Among families reporting disabilities, SSI/SSDI receipt predicted fewer returns to emergency shelter, and more income despite less work. Offers of long-term housing subsidies increased SSI/SSDI receipt. CONCLUSIONS: Many families experiencing homelessness have disabilities; those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits have better housing and income outcomes. Providing families experiencing homelessness with long-term housing subsidies and SSI/SSDI could improve public health. SN - 1876-7583 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28851508/Long_term_housing_subsidies_and_SSI/SSDI_income:_Creating_health_promoting_contexts_for_families_experiencing_housing_instability_with_disabilities_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1936-6574(17)30160-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -