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Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and cancer risk: results from the EPIC-Italy study.
Sci Rep 2017; 7(1):9757SR

Abstract

Factors linked to glucose metabolism are involved in the etiology of several cancers. High glycemic index (GI) or high glycemic load (GL) diets, which chronically raise postprandial blood glucose, may increase cancer risk by affecting insulin-like growth factor. We prospectively investigated cancer risk and dietary GI/GL in the EPIC-Italy cohort. After a median 14.9 years, 5112 incident cancers and 2460 deaths were identified among 45,148 recruited adults. High GI was associated with increased risk of colon and bladder cancer. High GL was associated with: increased risk of colon cancer; increased risk of diabetes-related cancers; and decreased risk of rectal cancer. High intake of carbohydrate from high GI foods was significantly associated with increased risk of colon and diabetes-related cancers, but decreased risk of stomach cancer; whereas high intake of carbohydrates from low GI foods was associated with reduced colon cancer risk. In a Mediterranean population with high and varied carbohydrate intake, carbohydrates that strongly raise postprandial blood glucose may increase colon and bladder cancer risk, while the quantity of carbohydrate consumed may be involved in diabetes-related cancers. Further studies are needed to confirm the opposing effects of high dietary GL on risks of colon and rectal cancers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.Department of Public Health, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.Department of Public Health, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, ISPO-Cancer Research and Prevention Institute, Florence, Italy.Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, ISPO-Cancer Research and Prevention Institute, Florence, Italy.Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. Unit of Epidemiology, Regional Health Service ASL TO3, Grugliasco, Turin, Italy.Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.Cancer Registry, Department of Medical Prevention, ASP Ragusa, Italy.Cancer Registry, Department of Medical Prevention, ASP Ragusa, Italy.Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. vittorio.krogh@istitutotumori.mi.it.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28851931

Citation

Sieri, S, et al. "Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Cancer Risk: Results From the EPIC-Italy Study." Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, 2017, p. 9757.
Sieri S, Agnoli C, Pala V, et al. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and cancer risk: results from the EPIC-Italy study. Sci Rep. 2017;7(1):9757.
Sieri, S., Agnoli, C., Pala, V., Grioni, S., Brighenti, F., Pellegrini, N., ... Krogh, V. (2017). Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and cancer risk: results from the EPIC-Italy study. Scientific Reports, 7(1), p. 9757. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-09498-2.
Sieri S, et al. Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Cancer Risk: Results From the EPIC-Italy Study. Sci Rep. 2017 08 29;7(1):9757. PubMed PMID: 28851931.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and cancer risk: results from the EPIC-Italy study. AU - Sieri,S, AU - Agnoli,C, AU - Pala,V, AU - Grioni,S, AU - Brighenti,F, AU - Pellegrini,N, AU - Masala,G, AU - Palli,D, AU - Mattiello,A, AU - Panico,S, AU - Ricceri,F, AU - Fasanelli,F, AU - Frasca,G, AU - Tumino,R, AU - Krogh,V, Y1 - 2017/08/29/ PY - 2017/04/05/received PY - 2017/07/27/accepted PY - 2017/8/31/entrez PY - 2017/8/31/pubmed PY - 2019/4/18/medline SP - 9757 EP - 9757 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - Factors linked to glucose metabolism are involved in the etiology of several cancers. High glycemic index (GI) or high glycemic load (GL) diets, which chronically raise postprandial blood glucose, may increase cancer risk by affecting insulin-like growth factor. We prospectively investigated cancer risk and dietary GI/GL in the EPIC-Italy cohort. After a median 14.9 years, 5112 incident cancers and 2460 deaths were identified among 45,148 recruited adults. High GI was associated with increased risk of colon and bladder cancer. High GL was associated with: increased risk of colon cancer; increased risk of diabetes-related cancers; and decreased risk of rectal cancer. High intake of carbohydrate from high GI foods was significantly associated with increased risk of colon and diabetes-related cancers, but decreased risk of stomach cancer; whereas high intake of carbohydrates from low GI foods was associated with reduced colon cancer risk. In a Mediterranean population with high and varied carbohydrate intake, carbohydrates that strongly raise postprandial blood glucose may increase colon and bladder cancer risk, while the quantity of carbohydrate consumed may be involved in diabetes-related cancers. Further studies are needed to confirm the opposing effects of high dietary GL on risks of colon and rectal cancers. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28851931/Dietary_glycemic_index_glycemic_load_and_cancer_risk:_results_from_the_EPIC_Italy_study_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-09498-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -