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Top-down effects of an invasive omnivore: detection in long-term monitoring of large-river reservoir chlorophyll-a.
Oecologia. 2017 Oct; 185(2):293-303.O

Abstract

Invasive species are capable of altering ecosystems through the consumption of basal resources. However, quantifying the effects of invasive species in large ecosystems is challenging. Measuring changes in basal resources (i.e., phytoplankton) at an ecosystem scale is an important and potentially translatable response vital to the understanding of how introduced species influence ecosystems. In this study, we analyzed patterns of early summer chlorophyll-a in a large-river reservoir in response to invasion of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix). We used 25 years of ecological data from a 30-km reach of Kentucky Lake collected before and after silver carp establishment. We found significant decreases in chlorophyll-a within certain reservoir habitats since establishment of silver carp. Additionally, environmental and biological drivers of phytoplankton production showed no significant differences before and after invasion. These results suggest seasonal, and habitat-specific consumptive effects of invasive silver carp on an important basal food web resource. Further, our results convey the utility of long-term quantitative biological and physiochemical data in understanding ecosystem responses to elements of global change (i.e., species invasions). Importantly, the observed changes in the basal food web resource of Kentucky Lake may apply to other ecosystems facing invasion by silver carp (e.g., Laurentian Great Lakes). Our study offers insight into the mechanisms by which silver carp may influence ecosystems and furthers our understanding of invasive omnivores.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Watershed Studies Institute, Murray State University, Murray, KY, 42071, USA. bbtumolo@gmail.com. Hancock Biological Station, Murray State University, Murray, KY, 42071, USA. bbtumolo@gmail.com. Department of Ecology, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173460, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3460, USA. bbtumolo@gmail.com.Watershed Studies Institute, Murray State University, Murray, KY, 42071, USA. Department of Biological Sciences, Murray State University, 2112 Biology Building, Murray, KY, 42071, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28852870

Citation

Tumolo, Benjamin B., and Michael B. Flinn. "Top-down Effects of an Invasive Omnivore: Detection in Long-term Monitoring of Large-river Reservoir Chlorophyll-a." Oecologia, vol. 185, no. 2, 2017, pp. 293-303.
Tumolo BB, Flinn MB. Top-down effects of an invasive omnivore: detection in long-term monitoring of large-river reservoir chlorophyll-a. Oecologia. 2017;185(2):293-303.
Tumolo, B. B., & Flinn, M. B. (2017). Top-down effects of an invasive omnivore: detection in long-term monitoring of large-river reservoir chlorophyll-a. Oecologia, 185(2), 293-303. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-017-3937-x
Tumolo BB, Flinn MB. Top-down Effects of an Invasive Omnivore: Detection in Long-term Monitoring of Large-river Reservoir Chlorophyll-a. Oecologia. 2017;185(2):293-303. PubMed PMID: 28852870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Top-down effects of an invasive omnivore: detection in long-term monitoring of large-river reservoir chlorophyll-a. AU - Tumolo,Benjamin B, AU - Flinn,Michael B, Y1 - 2017/08/29/ PY - 2015/12/15/received PY - 2017/08/22/accepted PY - 2017/8/31/pubmed PY - 2018/9/19/medline PY - 2017/8/31/entrez KW - Asian carp KW - Invasive species KW - Omnivory KW - Phytoplankton KW - Trophic ecology SP - 293 EP - 303 JF - Oecologia JO - Oecologia VL - 185 IS - 2 N2 - Invasive species are capable of altering ecosystems through the consumption of basal resources. However, quantifying the effects of invasive species in large ecosystems is challenging. Measuring changes in basal resources (i.e., phytoplankton) at an ecosystem scale is an important and potentially translatable response vital to the understanding of how introduced species influence ecosystems. In this study, we analyzed patterns of early summer chlorophyll-a in a large-river reservoir in response to invasion of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix). We used 25 years of ecological data from a 30-km reach of Kentucky Lake collected before and after silver carp establishment. We found significant decreases in chlorophyll-a within certain reservoir habitats since establishment of silver carp. Additionally, environmental and biological drivers of phytoplankton production showed no significant differences before and after invasion. These results suggest seasonal, and habitat-specific consumptive effects of invasive silver carp on an important basal food web resource. Further, our results convey the utility of long-term quantitative biological and physiochemical data in understanding ecosystem responses to elements of global change (i.e., species invasions). Importantly, the observed changes in the basal food web resource of Kentucky Lake may apply to other ecosystems facing invasion by silver carp (e.g., Laurentian Great Lakes). Our study offers insight into the mechanisms by which silver carp may influence ecosystems and furthers our understanding of invasive omnivores. SN - 1432-1939 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28852870/Top_down_effects_of_an_invasive_omnivore:_detection_in_long_term_monitoring_of_large_river_reservoir_chlorophyll_a_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-017-3937-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -