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Evaluation of Pharmacist-Initiated Interventions on Vaccination Rates in Patients with Asthma or COPD.
J Community Health 2018; 43(2):297-303JC

Abstract

To determine if pharmacy-initiated interventions improved the rate of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations in adult patients with asthma and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adult patients who filled prescriptions at one of three community pharmacies, who had a dispensing history indicative of an asthma and/or COPD diagnosis were randomized to receive a personal phone call or standardized mailed letter recommending influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations, or control with no vaccination information. The rate of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations was measured for each group and measured using Chi square. Of 831 eligible participants, 210 patients completed the study, and self-reported a diagnosis of asthma and/or COPD. The influenza vaccine was administered to 56 (72.7%), 55 (87.3%), and 62 (88.6%) patients (p = 0.019); pneumococcal vaccine was administered to 46 (59.7%), 39 (61.9%), and 39 (55.7%) patients in the phone call, letter, and control groups, respectively. While the control group had significantly more influenza vaccinations, between the interventions the letter showed a higher rate of influenza vaccination over the phone call. Reviewing patients under age 65, the letter had a significantly higher rate of influenza vaccination than the phone call (p = 0.021). No significant improvement was found for the pneumococcal vaccination. Patients under age 65 who received a mailed letter had a significantly higher rate of influenza vaccination than those who received a phone call, and had a higher rate of pneumococcal vaccination. A standardized, mailed letter may help community pharmacists improve vaccination rates in patients with asthma and/or COPD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Balls Food Stores, Grandview, MO, USA.University of Kansas School of Pharmacy, Lawrence, KS, USA.Balls Food Stores Hen House Pharmacy, Olathe, KS, USA. Adjunct Faculty, University of Kansas School of Pharmacy, Lawrence, KS, USA.University of Kansas School of Pharmacy, Lawrence, KS, USA. bmelton2@kumc.edu. University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Mailstop 4047, Kansas City, KS, USA. bmelton2@kumc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28852915

Citation

Klassing, Haley M., et al. "Evaluation of Pharmacist-Initiated Interventions On Vaccination Rates in Patients With Asthma or COPD." Journal of Community Health, vol. 43, no. 2, 2018, pp. 297-303.
Klassing HM, Ruisinger JF, Prohaska ES, et al. Evaluation of Pharmacist-Initiated Interventions on Vaccination Rates in Patients with Asthma or COPD. J Community Health. 2018;43(2):297-303.
Klassing, H. M., Ruisinger, J. F., Prohaska, E. S., & Melton, B. L. (2018). Evaluation of Pharmacist-Initiated Interventions on Vaccination Rates in Patients with Asthma or COPD. Journal of Community Health, 43(2), pp. 297-303. doi:10.1007/s10900-017-0421-9.
Klassing HM, et al. Evaluation of Pharmacist-Initiated Interventions On Vaccination Rates in Patients With Asthma or COPD. J Community Health. 2018;43(2):297-303. PubMed PMID: 28852915.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of Pharmacist-Initiated Interventions on Vaccination Rates in Patients with Asthma or COPD. AU - Klassing,Haley M, AU - Ruisinger,Janelle F, AU - Prohaska,Emily S, AU - Melton,Brittany L, PY - 2017/8/31/pubmed PY - 2019/2/8/medline PY - 2017/8/31/entrez KW - Community pharmacy KW - Patient education KW - Respiratory tract diseases KW - Vaccination SP - 297 EP - 303 JF - Journal of community health JO - J Community Health VL - 43 IS - 2 N2 - To determine if pharmacy-initiated interventions improved the rate of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations in adult patients with asthma and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adult patients who filled prescriptions at one of three community pharmacies, who had a dispensing history indicative of an asthma and/or COPD diagnosis were randomized to receive a personal phone call or standardized mailed letter recommending influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations, or control with no vaccination information. The rate of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations was measured for each group and measured using Chi square. Of 831 eligible participants, 210 patients completed the study, and self-reported a diagnosis of asthma and/or COPD. The influenza vaccine was administered to 56 (72.7%), 55 (87.3%), and 62 (88.6%) patients (p = 0.019); pneumococcal vaccine was administered to 46 (59.7%), 39 (61.9%), and 39 (55.7%) patients in the phone call, letter, and control groups, respectively. While the control group had significantly more influenza vaccinations, between the interventions the letter showed a higher rate of influenza vaccination over the phone call. Reviewing patients under age 65, the letter had a significantly higher rate of influenza vaccination than the phone call (p = 0.021). No significant improvement was found for the pneumococcal vaccination. Patients under age 65 who received a mailed letter had a significantly higher rate of influenza vaccination than those who received a phone call, and had a higher rate of pneumococcal vaccination. A standardized, mailed letter may help community pharmacists improve vaccination rates in patients with asthma and/or COPD. SN - 1573-3610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28852915/Evaluation_of_Pharmacist_Initiated_Interventions_on_Vaccination_Rates_in_Patients_with_Asthma_or_COPD_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10900-017-0421-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -