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Optimizing Heat Acclimation for Endurance Athletes: High- Versus Low-Intensity Training.
Int J Sports Physiol Perform 2018; 13(6):816-823IJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine the effect of high- versus low-intensity training in the heat and ensuing taper period in the heat on endurance performance.

METHODS

In total, 19 well-trained triathletes undertook 5 days of normal training and a 1-wk taper including either low- (heat acclimation [HA-L], n = 10) or high-intensity (HA-H, n = 9) training sessions in the heat (30°C, 50% relative humidity). A control group (n = 10) reproduced their usual training in thermoneutral conditions. Indoor 20-km cycling time trials (35°C, 50% relative humidity) were performed before (Pre) and after the main heat exposure (Mid) and after the taper (Post).

RESULTS

Power output remained stable in the control group from Pre to Mid (effect size: -0.10 [0.26]) and increased from Mid to Post (0.18 [0.22]). The HA-L group demonstrated a progressive increase in performance from Pre to Mid (0.62 [0.33]) and from Mid to Post (0.53 [0.30]), alongside typical physiological signs of HA (reduced core temperature and heart rate and increased body-mass loss). While the HA-H group presented similar adaptations, increased perceived fatigue and decreased performance at Mid (-0.35 [0.26]) were evidenced and reversed at Post (0.50 [0.20]). No difference in power output was reported at Post between the HA-H and control groups.

CONCLUSION

HA-H can quickly induce functional overreaching in nonacclimatized endurance athletes. As it was associated with a weak subsequent performance supercompensation, coaches and athletes should pay particular attention to training monitoring during a final preparation in the heat and reduce training intensity when early signs of functional overreaching are identified.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28872380

Citation

Schmit, Cyril, et al. "Optimizing Heat Acclimation for Endurance Athletes: High- Versus Low-Intensity Training." International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, vol. 13, no. 6, 2018, pp. 816-823.
Schmit C, Duffield R, Hausswirth C, et al. Optimizing Heat Acclimation for Endurance Athletes: High- Versus Low-Intensity Training. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2018;13(6):816-823.
Schmit, C., Duffield, R., Hausswirth, C., Brisswalter, J., & Le Meur, Y. (2018). Optimizing Heat Acclimation for Endurance Athletes: High- Versus Low-Intensity Training. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 13(6), pp. 816-823. doi:10.1123/ijspp.2017-0007.
Schmit C, et al. Optimizing Heat Acclimation for Endurance Athletes: High- Versus Low-Intensity Training. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2018 Jul 1;13(6):816-823. PubMed PMID: 28872380.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Optimizing Heat Acclimation for Endurance Athletes: High- Versus Low-Intensity Training. AU - Schmit,Cyril, AU - Duffield,Rob, AU - Hausswirth,Christophe, AU - Brisswalter,Jeanick, AU - Le Meur,Yann, Y1 - 2018/07/04/ PY - 2017/9/6/pubmed PY - 2018/8/9/medline PY - 2017/9/6/entrez KW - endurance performance KW - overreaching KW - pacing KW - training camp KW - training load SP - 816 EP - 823 JF - International journal of sports physiology and performance JO - Int J Sports Physiol Perform VL - 13 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: To determine the effect of high- versus low-intensity training in the heat and ensuing taper period in the heat on endurance performance. METHODS: In total, 19 well-trained triathletes undertook 5 days of normal training and a 1-wk taper including either low- (heat acclimation [HA-L], n = 10) or high-intensity (HA-H, n = 9) training sessions in the heat (30°C, 50% relative humidity). A control group (n = 10) reproduced their usual training in thermoneutral conditions. Indoor 20-km cycling time trials (35°C, 50% relative humidity) were performed before (Pre) and after the main heat exposure (Mid) and after the taper (Post). RESULTS: Power output remained stable in the control group from Pre to Mid (effect size: -0.10 [0.26]) and increased from Mid to Post (0.18 [0.22]). The HA-L group demonstrated a progressive increase in performance from Pre to Mid (0.62 [0.33]) and from Mid to Post (0.53 [0.30]), alongside typical physiological signs of HA (reduced core temperature and heart rate and increased body-mass loss). While the HA-H group presented similar adaptations, increased perceived fatigue and decreased performance at Mid (-0.35 [0.26]) were evidenced and reversed at Post (0.50 [0.20]). No difference in power output was reported at Post between the HA-H and control groups. CONCLUSION: HA-H can quickly induce functional overreaching in nonacclimatized endurance athletes. As it was associated with a weak subsequent performance supercompensation, coaches and athletes should pay particular attention to training monitoring during a final preparation in the heat and reduce training intensity when early signs of functional overreaching are identified. SN - 1555-0273 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28872380/Optimizing_Heat_Acclimation_for_Endurance_Athletes:_High__Versus_Low_Intensity_Training_ L2 - https://journals.humankinetics.com/doi/10.1123/ijspp.2017-0007 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -