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Desquamation takes center stage at the origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and stromal growth in benign prostate hyperplasia.

Abstract

In this commentary, we propose a relationship between desquamation, initially described as the collective detachment and deletion of epithelial cell in the prostate gland after castration, and proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) and stromal growth in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). First, in response to diverse stimuli, including inflammatory mediators, epithelial cells desquamate and leave a large surface of the luminal side of the basement membrane (BM) exposed. Basal cells are activated into intermediate-type cells, which change morphology to cover and remodel the exposed BM (simple atrophy) to a new physiological demand (such as in the hypoandrogen environment, simulated by surgical and/or chemical castration) and/or to support re-epithelialization (under normal androgen levels). In the presence of inflammation (that might be the cause of desquamation), the intermediate-type cells proliferate and characterize PIA. Second, in other circumstances, desquamation is an early step of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which contributes to stromal growth, as suggested by some experimental models of BPH. The proposed associations correlate unexplored cell behaviors and reveal the remarkable plasticity of the prostate epithelium that might be at the origin of prostate diseases.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biology, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas SP, Brazil.

    ,

    Department of Histology, Embryology, and Cell Biology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Goiás, Goiania GO, Brazil.

    ,

    Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials (IRCBM), COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore, Pakistan.

    ,

    Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biology, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas SP, Brazil.

    Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biology, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas SP, Brazil.

    Source

    Cell biology international 41:11 2017 Nov pg 1265-1270

    MeSH

    Atrophy
    Castration
    Epithelial Cells
    Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition
    Epithelium
    Humans
    Hyperplasia
    Inflammation
    Male
    Mesenchymal Stem Cells
    Prostate
    Prostatic Hyperplasia
    Receptors, Androgen

    Pub Type(s)

    Editorial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28877372

    Citation

    Ferrucci, Danilo, et al. "Desquamation Takes Center Stage at the Origin of Proliferative Inflammatory Atrophy, Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition, and Stromal Growth in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia." Cell Biology International, vol. 41, no. 11, 2017, pp. 1265-1270.
    Ferrucci D, Biancardi MF, Nishan U, et al. Desquamation takes center stage at the origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and stromal growth in benign prostate hyperplasia. Cell Biol Int. 2017;41(11):1265-1270.
    Ferrucci, D., Biancardi, M. F., Nishan, U., Rosa-Ribeiro, R., & Carvalho, H. F. (2017). Desquamation takes center stage at the origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and stromal growth in benign prostate hyperplasia. Cell Biology International, 41(11), pp. 1265-1270. doi:10.1002/cbin.10867.
    Ferrucci D, et al. Desquamation Takes Center Stage at the Origin of Proliferative Inflammatory Atrophy, Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition, and Stromal Growth in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia. Cell Biol Int. 2017;41(11):1265-1270. PubMed PMID: 28877372.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Desquamation takes center stage at the origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and stromal growth in benign prostate hyperplasia. AU - Ferrucci,Danilo, AU - Biancardi,Manoel F, AU - Nishan,Umar, AU - Rosa-Ribeiro,Rafaela, AU - Carvalho,Hernandes F, Y1 - 2017/09/29/ PY - 2017/07/20/received PY - 2017/09/03/accepted PY - 2017/9/7/pubmed PY - 2018/4/13/medline PY - 2017/9/7/entrez KW - EMT KW - benign prostate KW - castration KW - desquamation KW - hyperplasia KW - prostate SP - 1265 EP - 1270 JF - Cell biology international JO - Cell Biol. Int. VL - 41 IS - 11 N2 - In this commentary, we propose a relationship between desquamation, initially described as the collective detachment and deletion of epithelial cell in the prostate gland after castration, and proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) and stromal growth in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). First, in response to diverse stimuli, including inflammatory mediators, epithelial cells desquamate and leave a large surface of the luminal side of the basement membrane (BM) exposed. Basal cells are activated into intermediate-type cells, which change morphology to cover and remodel the exposed BM (simple atrophy) to a new physiological demand (such as in the hypoandrogen environment, simulated by surgical and/or chemical castration) and/or to support re-epithelialization (under normal androgen levels). In the presence of inflammation (that might be the cause of desquamation), the intermediate-type cells proliferate and characterize PIA. Second, in other circumstances, desquamation is an early step of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which contributes to stromal growth, as suggested by some experimental models of BPH. The proposed associations correlate unexplored cell behaviors and reveal the remarkable plasticity of the prostate epithelium that might be at the origin of prostate diseases. SN - 1095-8355 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28877372/Desquamation_takes_center_stage_at_the_origin_of_proliferative_inflammatory_atrophy,_epithelial-mesenchymal_transition,_and_stromal_growth_in_benign_prostate_hyperplasia L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cbin.10867 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -