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Monitoring disease progression in mild cognitive impairment: Associations between atrophy patterns, cognition, APOE and amyloid.
Neuroimage Clin. 2017; 16:418-428.NC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A disease severity index (SI) for Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been proposed that summarizes MRI-derived structural measures into a single score using multivariate data analysis.

OBJECTIVES

To longitudinally evaluate the use of the SI to monitor disease progression and predict future progression to AD in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Further, to investigate the association between longitudinal change in the SI and cognitive impairment, Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype as well as the levels of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ) peptide.

METHODS

The dataset included 195 AD, 145 MCI and 228 control subjects with annual follow-up for three years, where 70 MCI subjects progressed to AD (MCI-p). For each subject the SI was generated at baseline and follow-ups using 55 regional cortical thickness and subcortical volumes measures that extracted by the FreeSurfer longitudinal stream.

RESULTS

MCI-p subjects had a faster increase of the SI over time (p < 0.001). A higher SI at baseline in MCI-p was related to progression to AD at earlier follow-ups (p < 0.001) and worse cognitive impairment (p < 0.001). AD-like MCI patients with the APOE ε4 allele and abnormal Aβ levels had a faster increase of the SI, independently (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004).

CONCLUSIONS

Longitudinal changes in the SI reflect structural brain changes and can identify MCI patients at risk of progression to AD. Disease-related brain structural changes are influenced independently by APOE genotype and amyloid pathology. The SI has the potential to be used as a sensitive tool to predict future dementia, monitor disease progression as well as an outcome measure for clinical trials.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Neuroimaging, Centre for Neuroimaging Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience; King's College London, London, UK. NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, London, UK. NIHR Biomedical Research Unit for Dementia, London, UK.Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Neuroimaging, Centre for Neuroimaging Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience; King's College London, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28879083

Citation

Falahati, Farshad, et al. "Monitoring Disease Progression in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Associations Between Atrophy Patterns, Cognition, APOE and Amyloid." NeuroImage. Clinical, vol. 16, 2017, pp. 418-428.
Falahati F, Ferreira D, Muehlboeck JS, et al. Monitoring disease progression in mild cognitive impairment: Associations between atrophy patterns, cognition, APOE and amyloid. Neuroimage Clin. 2017;16:418-428.
Falahati, F., Ferreira, D., Muehlboeck, J. S., Eriksdotter, M., Simmons, A., Wahlund, L. O., & Westman, E. (2017). Monitoring disease progression in mild cognitive impairment: Associations between atrophy patterns, cognition, APOE and amyloid. NeuroImage. Clinical, 16, 418-428. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2017.08.014
Falahati F, et al. Monitoring Disease Progression in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Associations Between Atrophy Patterns, Cognition, APOE and Amyloid. Neuroimage Clin. 2017;16:418-428. PubMed PMID: 28879083.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Monitoring disease progression in mild cognitive impairment: Associations between atrophy patterns, cognition, APOE and amyloid. AU - Falahati,Farshad, AU - Ferreira,Daniel, AU - Muehlboeck,J-Sebastian, AU - Eriksdotter,Maria, AU - Simmons,Andrew, AU - Wahlund,Lars-Olof, AU - Westman,Eric, Y1 - 2017/08/14/ PY - 2017/03/08/received PY - 2017/08/03/revised PY - 2017/08/12/accepted PY - 2017/9/8/entrez PY - 2017/9/8/pubmed PY - 2018/5/11/medline KW - Alzheimer disease KW - Atrophy KW - Cognitive dysfunction KW - Disease progression KW - Longitudinal SP - 418 EP - 428 JF - NeuroImage. Clinical JO - Neuroimage Clin VL - 16 N2 - BACKGROUND: A disease severity index (SI) for Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been proposed that summarizes MRI-derived structural measures into a single score using multivariate data analysis. OBJECTIVES: To longitudinally evaluate the use of the SI to monitor disease progression and predict future progression to AD in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Further, to investigate the association between longitudinal change in the SI and cognitive impairment, Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype as well as the levels of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ) peptide. METHODS: The dataset included 195 AD, 145 MCI and 228 control subjects with annual follow-up for three years, where 70 MCI subjects progressed to AD (MCI-p). For each subject the SI was generated at baseline and follow-ups using 55 regional cortical thickness and subcortical volumes measures that extracted by the FreeSurfer longitudinal stream. RESULTS: MCI-p subjects had a faster increase of the SI over time (p < 0.001). A higher SI at baseline in MCI-p was related to progression to AD at earlier follow-ups (p < 0.001) and worse cognitive impairment (p < 0.001). AD-like MCI patients with the APOE ε4 allele and abnormal Aβ levels had a faster increase of the SI, independently (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Longitudinal changes in the SI reflect structural brain changes and can identify MCI patients at risk of progression to AD. Disease-related brain structural changes are influenced independently by APOE genotype and amyloid pathology. The SI has the potential to be used as a sensitive tool to predict future dementia, monitor disease progression as well as an outcome measure for clinical trials. SN - 2213-1582 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28879083/Monitoring_disease_progression_in_mild_cognitive_impairment:_Associations_between_atrophy_patterns_cognition_APOE_and_amyloid_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -