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Studying Electrotaxis in Microfluidic Devices.
Sensors (Basel). 2017 Sep 07; 17(9)S

Abstract

Collective cell migration is important in various physiological processes such as morphogenesis, cancer metastasis and cell regeneration. Such migration can be induced and guided by different chemical and physical cues. Electrotaxis, referring to the directional migration of adherent cells under stimulus of electric fields, is believed to be highly involved in the wound-healing process. Electrotactic experiments are conventionally conducted in Petri dishes or cover glasses wherein cells are cultured and electric fields are applied. However, these devices suffer from evaporation of the culture medium, non-uniformity of electric fields and low throughput. To overcome these drawbacks, micro-fabricated devices composed of micro-channels and fluidic components have lately been applied to electrotactic studies. Microfluidic devices are capable of providing cells with a precise micro-environment including pH, nutrition, temperature and various stimuli. Therefore, with the advantages of reduced cell/reagent consumption, reduced Joule heating and uniform and precise electric fields, microfluidic chips are perfect platforms for observing cell migration under applied electric fields. In this paper, I review recent developments in designing and fabricating microfluidic devices for studying electrotaxis, aiming to provide critical updates in this rapidly-growing, interdisciplinary field.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physics, Fu-Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan. 089957@mail.fju.edu.tw.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28880251

Citation

Sun, Yung-Shin. "Studying Electrotaxis in Microfluidic Devices." Sensors (Basel, Switzerland), vol. 17, no. 9, 2017.
Sun YS. Studying Electrotaxis in Microfluidic Devices. Sensors (Basel). 2017;17(9).
Sun, Y. S. (2017). Studying Electrotaxis in Microfluidic Devices. Sensors (Basel, Switzerland), 17(9). https://doi.org/10.3390/s17092048
Sun YS. Studying Electrotaxis in Microfluidic Devices. Sensors (Basel). 2017 Sep 7;17(9) PubMed PMID: 28880251.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Studying Electrotaxis in Microfluidic Devices. A1 - Sun,Yung-Shin, Y1 - 2017/09/07/ PY - 2017/08/11/received PY - 2017/09/05/revised PY - 2017/09/05/accepted PY - 2017/9/8/entrez PY - 2017/9/8/pubmed PY - 2017/9/8/medline KW - cell migration KW - electrotaxis KW - lab-on-a-chip KW - microfluidic chips JF - Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) JO - Sensors (Basel) VL - 17 IS - 9 N2 - Collective cell migration is important in various physiological processes such as morphogenesis, cancer metastasis and cell regeneration. Such migration can be induced and guided by different chemical and physical cues. Electrotaxis, referring to the directional migration of adherent cells under stimulus of electric fields, is believed to be highly involved in the wound-healing process. Electrotactic experiments are conventionally conducted in Petri dishes or cover glasses wherein cells are cultured and electric fields are applied. However, these devices suffer from evaporation of the culture medium, non-uniformity of electric fields and low throughput. To overcome these drawbacks, micro-fabricated devices composed of micro-channels and fluidic components have lately been applied to electrotactic studies. Microfluidic devices are capable of providing cells with a precise micro-environment including pH, nutrition, temperature and various stimuli. Therefore, with the advantages of reduced cell/reagent consumption, reduced Joule heating and uniform and precise electric fields, microfluidic chips are perfect platforms for observing cell migration under applied electric fields. In this paper, I review recent developments in designing and fabricating microfluidic devices for studying electrotaxis, aiming to provide critical updates in this rapidly-growing, interdisciplinary field. SN - 1424-8220 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28880251/Studying_Electrotaxis_in_Microfluidic_Devices_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=s17092048 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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