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Sexual Violence as a Key Contributor to Poor Mental Health Among Japanese Women Subjected to Intimate Partner Violence.
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2018 05; 27(5):716-723.JW

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to examine the impact of sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) on mental health among Japanese women and to explore to what extent sexual IPV is an important contributor to the severity of mental health problems in comparison with physical and psychological IPV.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of the medical records of participants during psychiatric consultation at the Institute of Women's Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University, including 62 women who experienced IPV without sexual violence and 83 women who experienced IPV with sexual violence. Mental health problems were compared, including anxiety, depression, suicidality, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and dissociative experiences.

RESULTS

The results demonstrated a higher incidence and severity of somatic symptoms, insomnia, social dysfunction, severe depression and suicidality, PTSD, and dissociative experiences among women in the sexual IPV group than in the women who experienced IPV without sexual violence. In analyzing the relative contribution of sexual, physical, and psychological violence to the severity of mental health problems of the survivors, results indicated that sexual violence was an independent predictor of both PTSD and dissociative experiences.

CONCLUSIONS

The present research showed that significant adverse effects on mental health were observed among women who experienced IPV with sexual violence compared with the ones without. These findings provide important implications for considering the specific approaches to meet the needs of those women experiencing sexual IPV and the need for timely and effective interventions, including healthcare, social services, and primary prevention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University , Melbourne, Australia .1 Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University , Melbourne, Australia .2 Institute of Women's Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo, Japan .1 Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University , Melbourne, Australia .2 Institute of Women's Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo, Japan .2 Institute of Women's Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo, Japan .2 Institute of Women's Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo, Japan .2 Institute of Women's Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo, Japan .3 Department of Adult Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry , Kodaira-city, Tokyo, Japan .1 Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University , Melbourne, Australia .2 Institute of Women's Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo, Japan .

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28880713

Citation

Honda, Tomoko, et al. "Sexual Violence as a Key Contributor to Poor Mental Health Among Japanese Women Subjected to Intimate Partner Violence." Journal of Women's Health (2002), vol. 27, no. 5, 2018, pp. 716-723.
Honda T, Wynter K, Yokota J, et al. Sexual Violence as a Key Contributor to Poor Mental Health Among Japanese Women Subjected to Intimate Partner Violence. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2018;27(5):716-723.
Honda, T., Wynter, K., Yokota, J., Tran, T., Ujiie, Y., Niwa, M., Nakayama, M., Ito, F., Kim, Y., Fisher, J., & Kamo, T. (2018). Sexual Violence as a Key Contributor to Poor Mental Health Among Japanese Women Subjected to Intimate Partner Violence. Journal of Women's Health (2002), 27(5), 716-723. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2016.6276
Honda T, et al. Sexual Violence as a Key Contributor to Poor Mental Health Among Japanese Women Subjected to Intimate Partner Violence. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2018;27(5):716-723. PubMed PMID: 28880713.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sexual Violence as a Key Contributor to Poor Mental Health Among Japanese Women Subjected to Intimate Partner Violence. AU - Honda,Tomoko, AU - Wynter,Karen, AU - Yokota,Jinko, AU - Tran,Thach, AU - Ujiie,Yuri, AU - Niwa,Madoka, AU - Nakayama,Michi, AU - Ito,Fumie, AU - Kim,Yoshiharu, AU - Fisher,Jane, AU - Kamo,Toshiko, Y1 - 2017/09/07/ PY - 2017/9/8/pubmed PY - 2018/10/26/medline PY - 2017/9/8/entrez KW - Japanese KW - PTSD KW - depression KW - dissociation KW - intimate partner sexual violence SP - 716 EP - 723 JF - Journal of women's health (2002) JO - J Womens Health (Larchmt) VL - 27 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) on mental health among Japanese women and to explore to what extent sexual IPV is an important contributor to the severity of mental health problems in comparison with physical and psychological IPV. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of the medical records of participants during psychiatric consultation at the Institute of Women's Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University, including 62 women who experienced IPV without sexual violence and 83 women who experienced IPV with sexual violence. Mental health problems were compared, including anxiety, depression, suicidality, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and dissociative experiences. RESULTS: The results demonstrated a higher incidence and severity of somatic symptoms, insomnia, social dysfunction, severe depression and suicidality, PTSD, and dissociative experiences among women in the sexual IPV group than in the women who experienced IPV without sexual violence. In analyzing the relative contribution of sexual, physical, and psychological violence to the severity of mental health problems of the survivors, results indicated that sexual violence was an independent predictor of both PTSD and dissociative experiences. CONCLUSIONS: The present research showed that significant adverse effects on mental health were observed among women who experienced IPV with sexual violence compared with the ones without. These findings provide important implications for considering the specific approaches to meet the needs of those women experiencing sexual IPV and the need for timely and effective interventions, including healthcare, social services, and primary prevention. SN - 1931-843X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28880713/Sexual_Violence_as_a_Key_Contributor_to_Poor_Mental_Health_Among_Japanese_Women_Subjected_to_Intimate_Partner_Violence_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/jwh.2016.6276?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -