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Early Folic Acid Supplement Initiation and Risk of Adverse Early Childhood Respiratory Health: A Population-based Study.
Matern Child Health J. 2018 01; 22(1):111-119.MC

Abstract

Objectives Folate plays a vital role in biologic functions yet women often do not meet the recommended dietary intake in pregnancy. It has been suggested that high folic acid intake during pregnancy may increase the risk of respiratory diseases in offspring. However, findings from observational studies in human populations are inconclusive. Methods In this population-based study, we collected self-reported folic acid and prenatal vitamin supplement use during pregnancy 3-6 months postpartum from mothers in Los Angeles whose children were born in 2003. Supplement initiation was based on whichever supplement, either folic acid or prenatal supplements, the women initiated first. In a 2006 follow-up survey, approximately 50% of women were re-contacted to gather information on the child's respiratory health, including symptoms and diagnoses, at approximately 3.5 years of age. Results Overall, timing of folic acid supplement initiation was not associated with wheeze or lower respiratory tract infection, even after accounting for preterm births and censoring at follow-up. However, children born to mothers with a history of atopy (hay fever, eczema or asthma) who initiate folic acid supplements in late pregnancy, compared to first trimester initiators, have 1.67 (95% CI 1.12, 2.49) times the risk of wheeze in the first 3 years of life and 1.88 (95% CI 1.05, 3.34) times the risk of wheeze in the past year. No association was found among children of non-atopic mothers. Conclusions These findings suggest that early folic acid or prenatal supplementation among atopic women may be important to prevent wheeze among offspring.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, 650 Charles E Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. vivianhelena@ucla.edu.Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, 650 Charles E Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.Department of Community Health Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, 650 Charles E Young Drive S, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, 650 Charles E Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28887720

Citation

Alfonso, Vivian H., et al. "Early Folic Acid Supplement Initiation and Risk of Adverse Early Childhood Respiratory Health: a Population-based Study." Maternal and Child Health Journal, vol. 22, no. 1, 2018, pp. 111-119.
Alfonso VH, Bandoli G, von Ehrenstein O, et al. Early Folic Acid Supplement Initiation and Risk of Adverse Early Childhood Respiratory Health: A Population-based Study. Matern Child Health J. 2018;22(1):111-119.
Alfonso, V. H., Bandoli, G., von Ehrenstein, O., & Ritz, B. (2018). Early Folic Acid Supplement Initiation and Risk of Adverse Early Childhood Respiratory Health: A Population-based Study. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 22(1), 111-119. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-017-2360-6
Alfonso VH, et al. Early Folic Acid Supplement Initiation and Risk of Adverse Early Childhood Respiratory Health: a Population-based Study. Matern Child Health J. 2018;22(1):111-119. PubMed PMID: 28887720.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early Folic Acid Supplement Initiation and Risk of Adverse Early Childhood Respiratory Health: A Population-based Study. AU - Alfonso,Vivian H, AU - Bandoli,Gretchen, AU - von Ehrenstein,Ondine, AU - Ritz,Beate, PY - 2017/9/10/pubmed PY - 2018/12/19/medline PY - 2017/9/10/entrez KW - Childhood asthma KW - Folic acid KW - Pregnancy and nutrition KW - Prenatal nutrition KW - Prenatal supplement KW - Respiratory health SP - 111 EP - 119 JF - Maternal and child health journal JO - Matern Child Health J VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - Objectives Folate plays a vital role in biologic functions yet women often do not meet the recommended dietary intake in pregnancy. It has been suggested that high folic acid intake during pregnancy may increase the risk of respiratory diseases in offspring. However, findings from observational studies in human populations are inconclusive. Methods In this population-based study, we collected self-reported folic acid and prenatal vitamin supplement use during pregnancy 3-6 months postpartum from mothers in Los Angeles whose children were born in 2003. Supplement initiation was based on whichever supplement, either folic acid or prenatal supplements, the women initiated first. In a 2006 follow-up survey, approximately 50% of women were re-contacted to gather information on the child's respiratory health, including symptoms and diagnoses, at approximately 3.5 years of age. Results Overall, timing of folic acid supplement initiation was not associated with wheeze or lower respiratory tract infection, even after accounting for preterm births and censoring at follow-up. However, children born to mothers with a history of atopy (hay fever, eczema or asthma) who initiate folic acid supplements in late pregnancy, compared to first trimester initiators, have 1.67 (95% CI 1.12, 2.49) times the risk of wheeze in the first 3 years of life and 1.88 (95% CI 1.05, 3.34) times the risk of wheeze in the past year. No association was found among children of non-atopic mothers. Conclusions These findings suggest that early folic acid or prenatal supplementation among atopic women may be important to prevent wheeze among offspring. SN - 1573-6628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28887720/Early_Folic_Acid_Supplement_Initiation_and_Risk_of_Adverse_Early_Childhood_Respiratory_Health:_A_Population_based_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-017-2360-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -