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Emotion processing in the infant brain: The importance of local information.
Neuropsychologia. 2019 03 18; 126:62-68.N

Abstract

Facial expressions provide crucial information for an infant's social and cognitive development. Expressions are discriminated based on specific basic-level information, such as global and local information represented in spatial frequencies. Research in adults suggests that different neural pathways are involved in emotion discrimination, each activated by specific spatial frequency ranges. However, in infants the involvement of spatial frequencies in emotion discrimination is unknown. In the current study we investigated the effect of manipulating spatial frequency information in the face on emotion discrimination. Infants aged 9-10 months (N = 61) viewed happy, fearful, and neutral faces. The faces contained either lower (related to global information) or higher spatial frequencies (related to local information). Brain activity in response to the faces was measured with electroencephalography. Interest was in the effect of emotion and spatial frequency on the amplitude of the N290, P400, and Nc components. Amplitudes of the N290 and P400 components differed between happy versus fearful or neutral faces, although only in the higher, and not the lower, spatial frequency condition. Amplitude of the Nc components differed between happy versus fearful or neutral faces regardless of spatial frequency condition. These results reveal the importance of higher spatial frequencies for emotion discrimination in infants (particularly at the N290 and P400 components). We related these findings to current models on the neural basis of facial-emotion processing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Developmental Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: C.vandenboomen@uu.nl.Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Developmental Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Developmental Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28889996

Citation

van den Boomen, Carlijn, et al. "Emotion Processing in the Infant Brain: the Importance of Local Information." Neuropsychologia, vol. 126, 2019, pp. 62-68.
van den Boomen C, Munsters NM, Kemner C. Emotion processing in the infant brain: The importance of local information. Neuropsychologia. 2019;126:62-68.
van den Boomen, C., Munsters, N. M., & Kemner, C. (2019). Emotion processing in the infant brain: The importance of local information. Neuropsychologia, 126, 62-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.09.006
van den Boomen C, Munsters NM, Kemner C. Emotion Processing in the Infant Brain: the Importance of Local Information. Neuropsychologia. 2019 03 18;126:62-68. PubMed PMID: 28889996.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emotion processing in the infant brain: The importance of local information. AU - van den Boomen,Carlijn, AU - Munsters,Nicolette M, AU - Kemner,Chantal, Y1 - 2017/09/07/ PY - 2017/02/01/received PY - 2017/08/30/revised PY - 2017/09/04/accepted PY - 2017/9/12/pubmed PY - 2020/3/7/medline PY - 2017/9/12/entrez KW - Development KW - Emotion KW - Event related potential KW - Spatial frequency SP - 62 EP - 68 JF - Neuropsychologia JO - Neuropsychologia VL - 126 N2 - Facial expressions provide crucial information for an infant's social and cognitive development. Expressions are discriminated based on specific basic-level information, such as global and local information represented in spatial frequencies. Research in adults suggests that different neural pathways are involved in emotion discrimination, each activated by specific spatial frequency ranges. However, in infants the involvement of spatial frequencies in emotion discrimination is unknown. In the current study we investigated the effect of manipulating spatial frequency information in the face on emotion discrimination. Infants aged 9-10 months (N = 61) viewed happy, fearful, and neutral faces. The faces contained either lower (related to global information) or higher spatial frequencies (related to local information). Brain activity in response to the faces was measured with electroencephalography. Interest was in the effect of emotion and spatial frequency on the amplitude of the N290, P400, and Nc components. Amplitudes of the N290 and P400 components differed between happy versus fearful or neutral faces, although only in the higher, and not the lower, spatial frequency condition. Amplitude of the Nc components differed between happy versus fearful or neutral faces regardless of spatial frequency condition. These results reveal the importance of higher spatial frequencies for emotion discrimination in infants (particularly at the N290 and P400 components). We related these findings to current models on the neural basis of facial-emotion processing. SN - 1873-3514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28889996/Emotion_processing_in_the_infant_brain:_The_importance_of_local_information_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0028-3932(17)30332-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -